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What is the difference between a t-bone steak and a porterhouse?

asked by @amandahesser almost 4 years ago
8 answers 1495 views
Miglore
Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

added almost 4 years ago

Beefcutshortlointenderloin They both consist of a T-shaped bone with meat on each side. Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and contain a much larger section of the tenderloin.

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 4 years ago

According to a wiki entry, "he T-bone and Porterhouse are steak cuts of beef. They consist of a T-shaped bone with meat on each side. The larger side is the strip steak meat, which is from the short loin, whereas the smaller side contains the tenderloin. Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and contain a much larger section of the tenderloin. T-bone steaks are cut from farther forward in the short loin and contain a comparatively smaller section of the tenderloin." http://en.wikipedia.org... More importantly however: what are your objectives for the meal at issue here? ;o) P.S. That drawing posted earlier is shown at the link I have included.

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aargersi

Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 4 years ago

Porterhouse is better for sharing :-) 2 steaks in one!!!

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 4 years ago

The short answer is that the porterhouse cut has a larger section of the tenderloin as AJ noted. Funny how Wiki actually gets this right sometimes. Now for the closest thing to a bistecca fiorentina ask your butcher for a double thick porterhouse and cook it over a wood---not gas, not briquet---fire.

Uruguay2010_61
added almost 4 years ago

I am sorry, but being a third generation butcher who only knows how to break down meat from whole carcasses . . they are the same thing. Later in the "evolution" of the meat business, some butchers became a little more creative and called only the thicker end t bone, even though, those before them called both ends t bone. It is all about marketing and getting more more with clever names.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 4 years ago

A good example of marketing smarts would be the way in which the common brown mushroom suddenly became "cremini" and "portabella". I'm cooking three standing rib roasts this weekend but the vegetarian horde insists on stuffed portabella (possibly because it sounds cool. I tried to talk them out of it because I think it's a lackluster mushroom with a not terribly pleasant flavor.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 4 years ago

BTW there is an excellent new book out there for meatarians, PRIMAL CUTS: COOKING WITH AMERICA'S BEST BUTCHERS by Marissa Guggiana with front matter by the crazy, Dante quoting, Tuscan butcher Dario Cecchini and Andrew Zimmern.

Desert
added almost 4 years ago

Usuba dashi is so right. Been in the food industry my whole life and when I go to the grocery store I see so many "cuts" that I have never heard of or put a definition on. Classic example is "London Broil'. What the hell is that. Ask fifteen people and get fifteen different answers yet the "meat buyers guide" doesn't list it. Yet so many think it's a quality cut.