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What is Kosher Salt?

I don't think there is such a thing in the UK. I am guessing the equivalent might be Sea Salt?! Or can I just use table salt.

Thanks!

asked by KatieCooks over 3 years ago
11 answers 838 views
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added over 3 years ago

Kosher salt is just coarse table salt (NaCl).

Ozoz_profile
added over 3 years ago

5542505074_e3ca40e47c_z Kosher salt is additive-free salt, generally used for 'koshering' meat according to Jewish practices. Its grains are small, flat crystals and dissolve evenly in a mix

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 3 years ago

Kitchen Butterfly is correct, and despite what some folks think it doesn't have to be blessed by a rabbi. It is indeed used for "koshering". It's not a sea salt, but a coarse sea salt is a perfectly good (and perhaps better) substitute.

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added over 3 years ago

Bacause Kosher salt has such large crystals, be aware that 1 tsp of kosher is about equivalent of 1/2 teaspoon of fine grained salt and adjust your recipe accordingly. Kosher salt does not have additives such as iodine and anti-caking agents like table salt does. Sea salt is a fine substitute.

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added over 3 years ago

All (additive-free) salt is kosher. The reference to kosher salt simply means it is coarse salt which can be used for koshering (or kashering) as Kitchen Butterfly said.

Dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 3 years ago

I use Kosher salt and sea salt in equal quantities, especially Kosher salt which consists of a hollow crystal.

Farmer's_market
added over 3 years ago

There is indeed kosher salt that IS actually kosher, even if that's not where its name comes from. (No doubt there are kosher 'style' salts available too - no additives, flat grain, etc. - that aren't technically kosher.)

Look for the little 'U' symbol on the box - even the common supermarket brand, Morton's, has it - if it's there it means it's been produced/handled per kosher law, overseen by a rabbi and so on; it's not really just a matter of what's in it.

Sit2
added over 3 years ago

Remember that that the two major brands Diamond and Morton's have different weights.
That can really throw off a brine. Most recipes default to using the Diamond Brand unless specified.

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added over 3 years ago

Cooky was also right about the NaCl - Sodium chloride, common salt, which implies no additives. Of course, "table salt" depends on what you buy.

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added over 3 years ago

Thankyou everyone!

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added over 3 years ago

The kosher salt they have in the US dissolves really quickly and easily, which can be handy at the end of a dish, rather than the coarse sea salt. I've never seen the same kind of salt outside the US.