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Making sour cherry chutney- can I can like I would jam?

Hi, I want to make a batch of sour cherry chutney for the first time. I've canned lots of jam and preserves using the water bath method. Do/Can I process chutney in the same way if I want to give some as gifts? Thank you!!

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Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

I can all of my chutneys and they are fine! It has a good amount of sugar and vinegar ... make sure to boil the full 15-20 minutes (I usually err on the side of additional time when in doubt)

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Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

Fantastic, aargersi. From reading through your recipes, I can tell you are a real pro. Thanks much!!!

Junechamp

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

I know I don't really need to answer because it's already been said, but yes, you definitely can! ;)

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Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

Many thanks, ChefJune! Congrats on your crab beignets, btw! :)

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Hedonia added almost 3 years ago

There's no way to tell from what you've said whether there's sufficient acid in the recipe to make it safe for water-bath canning. Most chutneys have low-acid ingredients like peppers and onions in them, which can bring the pH up to above safe levels. Botulism is a very real danger, and you should not water-bath can untested recipes.

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Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

Thanks, Hedonia. Why are jams fine for water-bath canning then?
As you can tell, I've not canned anything other than fruit jams and brandied peaches before. Thanks all!

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Hedonia added almost 3 years ago

It depends on the jam. Most fruits, like berries and stone fruit, are sufficiently high in acid, and so long as you don't add low-acid things to alter the pH, they're fine. Some fruits, like figs, are not, and need to be acidified to be brought up to safe levels. Tested recipes such as those put out by the USDA and Ball have had their acid levels tested professionally to ensure a pH of 4.6 or higher, which will kill botulin spores. Otherwise they can reproduce in anoxic conditions, which is when they produce the toxin that causes botulism.

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Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

Very informative. Many thanks!

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Hedonia added almost 3 years ago

When in doubt, always check here: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/

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AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 3 years ago

I'm 100% with Hedonia on this one. But take heart, as there must be plenty of sour cherry jam chutney recipes out there. (Actually, I'd have no hesitation substituting sour cherries for regular cherries in a recipe for a chutney using the latter, as all cherries have similar pH levels, with sour cherries being more acidic.) Once you find a cherry chutney recipe you like, you can tinger with the spices to your heart's content. ;o)

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Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

I very much appreciate all this advice, food52ers. I read the UGA canning guide cover to cover and found a great rhubarb chutney recipe that I added the sour cherries to. It's divine! Do y'all try to eat your canned goods within a year's time?

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