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I am in the processes of baking a chocolate cake that calls for unsweetened cocoa powder, but the only kind I have in my pantry is "dutch processed". Since the recipe doesn't specify what kind of cocoa to use, can I use it anyway? Or do I need to make an adjustment to the baking powder?

asked by KitchenKim almost 4 years ago
10 answers 3012 views
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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 4 years ago

You can use it. Your cake will be dark and chocolatey. Here's what teh hershey's website says about Dutch process cocoa:
Dutched cocoa powder undergoes a process where an alkaline solution is applied to the cocoa powder. “Dutching” results in a darker cocoa powder with a somewhat smoother flavor for some products. “Dutching” may also be done to increase the solubility, or the ability of the cocoa powder to dissolve in water. However, this process also depletes the flavanol content of cocoa powder. Natural cocoa powder is cocoa powder that has not been through the “dutching” process.

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added almost 4 years ago

I think that it's actually the right one to use, since your recipe calls for baking powder. Dutch processed doesn't react to baking soda. I think you're fine.

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added almost 4 years ago

Drdabs -thanks so much for doing the research. I understand that when using "dutched-processed" cocoa, an adjustments need to be made to either the baking soda or the baking powder...any ideas?

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added almost 4 years ago

From the joy of baking.com:
Dutch-Processed or Alkalized Unsweetened Cocoa Powder is treated with an alkali to neutralize its acids. Because it is neutral and does not react with baking soda, it must be used in recipes calling for baking powder
, unless there are other acidic ingredients in sufficient quantities used. It has a reddish-brown color, mild flavor, and is easy to dissolve in liquids. Its delicate flavor makes it ideal in baked goods like European cakes and pastries where its subtle flavor complements other ingredients. Droste, Lindt, Valrhona, Poulain and Pernigotti are some popular brands.

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added almost 4 years ago

With further research, I found the answer :).
Cocoa, Unsweetened:

Substitute equal amounts of Dutch-processed cocoa for unsweetened cocoa. Leave out any baking soda called for in the recipe.

3 tablespoon carob powder plus 2 tablespoons water for every 1-ounce unsweetened cocoa.

Do not substitute instant cocoa mix for unsweetened cocoa in any recipe.


Dutch-Process Cocoa:

3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder plus a pinch (1/8 teaspoon) baking soda for every 1-ounce Dutch-Process Cocoa.

1 ounce unsweetened chocolate plus 1/8 teaspoon baking soda (reduce fat in recipe by 1 tablespoon).

3 tablespoons carob powder for every 1-ounce Dutch Process Cocoa.

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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 4 years ago

Tiggy Bee is right! here's teh more complete answer:

Dutch-Process Cocoa or Alkalized Unsweetened Cocoa Powder:

Has been treated with an alkali to neutralize its natural acidity. Because it is neutral and does not react with baking soda, it must be used in recipes calling for baking powder, unless there are other acidic ingredients in sufficient quantities used. It has a reddish-brown color, mild flavor, and is easy to dissolve in liquids.

Unsweetened Cocoa:

Has a complex chocolate flavor while the Dutch-process is darker and more mellow. Its intense flavor makes it well suited for use in brownies, cookies and some chocolate cakes. When natural cocoa (an acid) is used in recipes calling for baking soda (an alkali), it creates a leavening action that causes the batter to rise when placed in the oven.







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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 4 years ago

oh, how funny, we're all doing research at the same time.

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added almost 4 years ago

drbabs, I've just had a crash course in cocoa powders!! : )

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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 4 years ago

Me, too!

Mrs._larkin_370
mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

added almost 4 years ago

I just saw this. Is this the applesauce cake that went kerflewey?