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What FOOD52 holiday cookies, bars or other treats work well for shipping to friends and family far away? Read on, please . . . ;o)

I'm looking for durable treats that won't arrive as crumbs, and that will taste good 4 or 5 days after making. Currently on my list are Fudgy Bourbon Balls and Peppermint Pretzel Bark, so I'm looking for a few (not chocolate) cookies and/or bars. Thanks so much, everyone. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked almost 3 years ago
9 answers 1091 views
Dsc_0122.nef-1
added almost 3 years ago

Wanderash's Chile cinnamon bark..

3-bizcard
sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

My ribbon cookies travel well, you don't have to do the chocolate layer, you can improvise with different flavors or just make the cardamom, orange which is what I do to make shaped cookies for Christmas. I sent them to hardlikearmour and she said they arrived in one piece and she really liked them.
http://www.food52.com/recipes...

Lorigoldsby
added almost 3 years ago

My heavenly hash travels very well. You can flavor store bought mini marshmallows (which are more shelf stable than homemade) by pouring 1 t. Of peppermint extract on a paper towel and sealing it in a ziplock bag with the marshmallows for 4 hours. I did this with my cooking class and they were impressed with the ease. Also, if you make chocolate bark, just break into a few larger pieces and the traveling will do the rest of the work for you. The big hit this weekend was white chocolate with pink Himalayan salt and pink peppercorns, dried craisins and dried blueberries and sliced almonds.

Dsc_0122.nef-1
added almost 3 years ago

A little package of chai spice blend (I just added the recipe today), Its guaranteed to arrive in one piece!

Flower-bee
added almost 3 years ago

AJ, how about the so called Anzac biscuits. The Australian cookie that was developed especially for the purpose of being shipped to soldiers by their families. They usually have a good amount of coconut in them and are neither easily perishable nor prone to crumbling or breaking. There are different variations that can be found online, but the ones from Australian sources are the most authentic ones. I'll see if I can find a few good ones.

Flower-bee
added almost 3 years ago

<a href="http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/anzac-biscuits-10000000520070/" target="_blank">http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/anzac-biscuits-10000000520070/</a> Here is one by Cooking light. If a small amount of chocolate is fine you could lace them to dress them up. Your slow roasted pecans would also be nice maybe ligtly candied. And if you were to make a Christmas nibble of sorts that has popcorn in it, it will act as a buffer to breakage.

Dsc00426
added almost 3 years ago

i know this doesn't really sound all that festive or decadent, but this granola is really an indulgence. i guest-blogged the recipe here (you can, of course, omit the cocoa nibs):

http://teachergoesbacktoschool...

vrunka's orange cardamom fig newtons might work:
http://www.food52.com/recipes...

Dsc00426
added almost 3 years ago

i've also always wanted to make these. i'd probably use brown rice syrup instead of the maltose:

http://kitchentigress.blogspot...

Bigpan
added almost 3 years ago

I would suggest a dark chocolate "bark" with raisins and nuts. Make in round or square moulds, wrap in cello with ribbon. The dark chocolate is harder than milk and will survive a trip via the post office !