Suzanne Goin's Corned Beef and Cabbage with Parsley-Mustard Sauce

By • March 15, 2012 • 36 Comments



Author Notes: This California twist on the corned beef and cabbage feast is untraditional in all the right places -- and almost as easy as the old school dump-in-the-crock pot approach, with a few brilliant tweaks. Goin divorces the vegetables from the meat so they're free to cook in their own time. In an exciting twist, she also throws the beef in the oven to brown and crisp up a bit at the end. Finally, she gives it just what any salty, long-cooked broth craves: a sauce that vibrates with life. Recipe adapted very slightly from Sunday Suppers at Lucques by Suzanne Goin with Teri Gelber (Knopf, 2005)Genius Recipes

Serves 6, with leftovers

For the Corned Beef and Vegetables

  • 1 6-pound corned-beef brisket
  • 2 onions
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 2 bay leaves, preferably fresh
  • 1/2 bunch thyme
  • 2 chiles de arbol
  • 6 small carrots
  • 9 golf ball-sized turnips
  • 1 1/4 pound yellow potatoes, peeled
  • 1 medium green cabbage (about 2 pounds)
  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.
  2. Place the corned beef in a large deep pot and cover with cold water by 6 inches. Bring to a boil over medium heat.
  3. Cut the onions in half lengthwise, peel them, and poke one clove into each half.
  4. When the water comes to a boil, turn off the heat and add the onions, bay leaves, thyme, and chiles. Cover the pot with aluminum foil and a tight-fitting lid.
  5. Cook the corned beef in the oven 4 to 4 1/2 hours, until it's fork-tender. (Carefully remove the foil and pierce the meat with a fork. If the fork doesn't penetrate easily, the corned beef is not ready.)
  6. While the beef is cooking, peel the carrots, leaving 1/2 inch of stem. Cut the carrots in half lengthwise. Trim the turnip tops, leaving 1/2 inch of stem attached. Cut the turnips in half through the stems. Cut the potatoes into 1- inch chunks. Remove any tough outer leaves from the cabbage and slice it in half through the core. Cut each cabbage half into three wedges, leaving the core intact to hold the leaves together.
  7. When it's done, remove the meat from the oven, let it cool a few minutes, and transfer it to a baking sheet.
  8. Turn the oven up to 375 degrees F.
  9. Return the meat to the oven for about 15 minutes, until it browns and crisps on top. If it's not browning to your liking, you can pass it under the broiler. Let the corned beef rest 10 to 15 minutes before slicing it.
  10. Meanwhile, skim the fat from the broth. (There probably won't be very much.) Taste the broth. If it tastes good -- not too salty but nicely seasoned and meaty -- set half of the liquid aside in a medium saucepan. If the broth is salty, add a little water before setting half of it aside.
  11. Add water to the broth in the large corned-beef cooking pot until you have enough liquid to poach the vegetables. Bring to a boil over high heat, then turn the heat down to medium, and add the potatoes to the pot. Simmer 5 minutes and then add the cabbage, turnips, and carrots. (If your pot is not big enough, divide the broth into two pots, adding more water if needed.) Simmer over low heat 15 to 20 minutes, until the vegetables are very tender. Test each type of vegetable occasionally, and if one is ready before the others, use tongs or a slotted spoon to take the vegetables out of the broth.
  12. Taste the reserved broth and the vegetable-cooking broth. Combine them to your taste. If the vegetable broth tastes best, use it for the finished broth. If the vegetable broth is watery but has good flavor, add a little of it to the reserved broth, to your liking. Or, if you like the meat broth best, use it by itself.
  13. Place the cabbage on a large warm platter. Slice the corned beef against the grain into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Arrange the meat over the cabbage. Scatter the other vegetables over and around the platter. Pour over a good quantity of your chosen broth, and drizzle with the parsley-mustard sauce. Pass the extra broth and sauce at the table.

For the Parsley-Mustard Sauce

  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons finely diced shallots
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 3/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon whole grain mustard
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 lemon, for juicing
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  1. Place the shallots, vinegar, and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a small bowl, and let sit 5 minutes. Pound the parsley with a mortar and pestle and add it to the shallots. Whisk in the mustard and olive oil, and season with a squeeze of lemon juice, a pinch of pepper and a pinch more salt, if you like. Be careful not to overseason, since the corned beef may be on the salty side.
Jump to Comments (36)

Comments (36) Questions (8)

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5 months ago ihaventpoisonedyouyet

Owing to my failure to make Irish soda bread earlier in the day, I was forced to use my one oven for baking and to forego the browning step for the meat. It was still great. I did double the carrots as they are my favorite part of the meal and I came very close to skipping the sauce as it didn't seem appropriate for a traditional corned beef dinner. Thank god I didn't!! I'm telling you that that sauce is absolutely unbelievable - packed with layers of flavor and easy to make. When there is silence at the dinner table you know you've got a winner and we were like a group of monastic monks who had taken a vow never to speak again. The sauce is also terrific on all manner of vegetables and chicken. I also used it on a hamburger (nothing wrong there) and if I could I swear I would put in on my morning cereal. A seriously delicious recipe (meat, vegetables, sauce).

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6 months ago Megan

This is fantastic! I really liked the touch of browning the meat at the end -- created some nice crispy bits while still having a tender piece of corned beef.

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6 months ago Sauertea

Amazing! Simply amazing! I have searched for years for a good recipe for corned beef and cabbage! I have finally found it!!!

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6 months ago ABG

Made it and it was outstanding! Got rave reviews from all my dinner guests.

Stringio

over 1 year ago ktmckinsey

I made this for St Patrick's Day. Wow! The spicy mustard really made the meal special. I didn't even use high-grade whole grain mustard (store brand all the way) and it was spectacular. I'll be making this again soon.

Stringio

over 1 year ago ktmckinsey

Meant to say "parsley mustard" instead of spicy mustard.

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over 1 year ago Michael Burke

My son was enjoying it and was about to ask for a little mustard when he spotted the Parsley Mustard Sauce. He was blown away by it... elevated the meal. Alone with some Irish Soda Bread and a pint of Guinness-- not a bad St Patty's Day!

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over 1 year ago mbj913

the parsley mustard sauce makes this.

Stringio

over 1 year ago annasmithclark

Delicious - the parsley sause was perfect. We added a beet horseradish.
Mmmm! SO good!

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over 1 year ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Delish!

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over 1 year ago stu4don

I did this last year and it was absolutely perfect. Couldn't find a 6 lb corned beef so I bought two 3.5 lb-ers one is 'eye of the round' the other flat cut. Should I cook them separately or can put them both in the same pot and how long? Thanks!

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

You'd just want to make sure that the simmering water could get to all the brisket -- if they were stacked tightly, the mid-section might not get cooked as thoroughly. I think you could space them out in the pot by nestling the onion in between. If so, the cooking time shouldn't change much -- might be a little shorter if the pieces are skinny. Hope it's as good as last year's!

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over 1 year ago edelpiano

OMG!!! this was wonderful. I have a wood fired oven in our yard and this is where I prepared this wonderful corn beef! It was truly amazing and we especially loved the parsley mustard sauce what a great addition!!!!!

Stringio

over 1 year ago Nancy Winfield Poetes

I make a paste of brown sugar, yellow mustard and cracked black pepper and spread this on the corned beef before baking it. Gives it the same brightness as the parsley sauce.

Stringio

over 1 year ago Kay Jarvis

My plan this year is similar. I have been boiling and then roasting for a number of years and it finally occurred to me that I will roast the veggies along with the corned beef. I'm planning to lay everything out on a roasting sheet, quarted cabbage, nice slender carrots, split leeks, small halved potatoes and the boiled meet at 415 degrees for about 15 minutes. Then horseradish sauce and mustard sauce on the side. And soda bread.

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over 1 year ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

is this best made the day it's to be served, or can i make a day early?

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

A day ahead would be great -- I'd cook the vegetables on the day of or reheat them gently do they don't fall apart. Hope you like it!

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over 1 year ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

fantastic! thanks kristen!

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over 1 year ago Midge

Made this last year for St. Patrick's Day and I'll never make it another way. Delicious.

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over 1 year ago likokai

Me, too! I am so excited to be able to make this again! This is my St. Patrick's Day menu-thanks so much!

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over 1 year ago loubaby

I am so glad you tried this..I have this cookbook and haven't tried this yet...now I will for sure this year....thanks so much...

Stringio

over 1 year ago kate.r.cochran

Is there a fresh herb you recommend other than parsley that goes nicely with the mustard and other flavors? I have a very deep aversion to it... I've read somewhere that certain people have a quirk in their DNA that makes cilantro unpalatable to them and I'm wondering if there aren't people with quirky DNA that makes them unable to enjoy parsley.

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

You could try some tarragon or dill, maybe with some chives, or maybe bulked up with a green like arugula, depending on which flavors you like best. (To taste, of course!)

Stringio

over 1 year ago kate.r.cochran

I like tarragon! It's a nice, bright herb. Thanks!

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over 1 year ago fhp

I love "green sauces" and this recipe is a nice take on the classic Italian bollito with its salsa verde and "mustard" . I have an abundance of chervil in my garden so I tried a mix of chervil and mint and the result was astonishing and dare I say very green.

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over 2 years ago GSmodden

I was sick over the weekend, but I still wanted to make something special for Easter Sunday and this looked not that work intensive. The meat was beyond tender. The veges provided a good accompaniment to the meat. The sauce added a tangy kick. But for a sick gal, the broth felt soothing on my scratchy throat. Sipping it I felt warm all over. It was so comforting that I saved some of the broth to use for a soup later. Just what I needed. Thanks for this great recipe.

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over 2 years ago superlotto

I am thinking this might be a good street food. What if you were to make won ton taco shells, chopped cabbage that was blanched added chopped corned beef and topped with a horseradish chipotle cream sauce. Any ideas to improve this?

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over 1 year ago loubaby

only some chopped onions to go along with it...sounds tasty indeed

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over 2 years ago cookbookchick

I made this yesterday. Like JoyP, I used my pressure cooker for the corned beef, and cooked the veggies as Suzanne instructs in her recipe, on the stove top. What a beautiful presentation and so delicious! And yes, the sauce makes this traditional meal really shine! My daughter said, "You can make this sauce again! It would be good as a salad dressing, too!"