Ecuadorian Goat Stew

By • December 13, 2012 • 4 Comments

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Author Notes: This stew is one of my favorite Ecuadorian dishes, particularly because it's so versatile. Personally, I love the tenderness and distinct flavor of goat meat, but you can substitute it for just about any other protein (though I highly recommend using cuts that include the bone). Now, don't be intimidated by the unfamiliar ingredients. You should be able to find the annatto seeds (also known as achiote) and panela in the latin or ethnic section of your local supermarket. Certainly in a latin grocery store if you have one near by. As for naranjillas, if you can't find them fresh, you might find naranjilla concentrate in the frozen section of your supermarket, which will do just fine. However, if you're having a hard time finding said ingredients, I suggest substituting paprika for annatto, dark brown sugar for panela, and pinneaple juice for naranjilla juice.
To keep it traditional, serve with a hearty portion of yellow rice, sliced avocados and fried plantains. Buen Provecho!
sashimi

Serves 5

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 red onion
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 1 bell pepper
  • 2 scallions
  • 5 minced cloves of garlic
  • 2 finely chopped tomatoes
  • 2 pounds goat meat (with bones, cut into medium chunks)
  • 3 tablespoons grated panela
  • 1/2 cup naranjilla juice
  • 1 cup any pale lager beer
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 2 teaspoons ground annatto seed
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 3 sprigs chopped parsley
  1. Combine salt, black ground pepper, cumin and minced garlic in a large bowl.
  2. Add goat meat and use your (clean) hands to thoroughly and evenly rub the spices into the meat. Don't be afraid to get a little dirty.
  3. Pour in the beer and allow the meat to marinate for at least an hour.
  4. Mince the bell pepper and onions. Use only the white part of the scallions.
  5. Heat half of the butter and all of the olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Once melted, add the pepper, onions, ground annatto seeds and cook until tender. Approximately 5 minutes. This is the "refrito." Set aside.
  6. Remove the meat from marinade and save the liquid.
  7. In a deep 6qt saute pan, melt the remainder of the butter and add the meat. Saute over medium-high heat and turn over the pieces every so often until all sides are browned and slightly caramelized.
  8. Add the "refrito," mix well and cook for another minute to integrate all the flavors.
  9. Add all the remaining ingredients, including the marinade and mix well.
  10. Bring to a boil, then lower the temperature to your lowest setting, cover and cook between 1.5-2 hours until the meat is tender and the liquids have reduced by about half.
  11. Taste and adjust salt and spices if necessary. Serve warm and enjoy!
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almost 2 years ago Geraldine a.h.

You say mince the bell peppers in the instructions, but there is no bell pepper in the ingredients section, how many bell peppers are needed? I ended up guessing the amount, it's amazing!!!

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almost 2 years ago sashimi

Thank you, I hadn't noticed! Just fixed it.
I'm very happy you enjoyed it!

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about 2 years ago aargersi

Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

I am for sure making this - we have a goat guy at the farmer's market and the only thing I haven't seen (but haven't looked for) is narajilla - I am super excited to try this!! Are black beans also common in Ecuador?

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about 2 years ago sashimi

Happy you're giving it shot :) Let me know how you like it.
Black beans are not so common in Ecuador, but I think they would nonetheless make a great side dish to this stew.