Caroline J. Beck's 6-Minute Meyer Lemon Olive Oil Custard

By • March 20, 2013 • 19 Comments

462 Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!


Author Notes: Though this is called a custard, it doesn't stand up straight and proper the way other custards do -- it sort of mounds and sways. It's thicker than than a creme anglaise, but not so sharp-edged as a curd. It could stand in for any of these things, but it's in a class alone. Honestly, what it most resembles is a good homemade mayonnaise. (You were looking for a mayo you could eat for dessert, right? You got it, friends.) Adapted from "A Secret Weapon For Silky Custard: Vitamix Blender," Zester Daily (February 20, 2013)Genius Recipes

Serves 6

  • 3 whole eggs, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup Meyer lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Meyer lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, preferably fresh olio nuovo
  1. Place all ingredients but the olive oil in a high-speed blender (capable of generating frictional heat above 160 F). If you don't have a high-speed blender, see note in step 4.
  2. Turn the blender on to its highest setting and process for 4 minutes.
  3. While continuing to run on high speed, pour in the olive oil and blend for an additional 90 to 105 seconds until you can see the custard firming up on the sides.
  4. If you don't have a high speed blender, simply blend until smooth and frothy in step 2, stream in the olive oil with the motor running, then pour into a double boiler or bowl set over gently simmering water on the stovetop, stirring until it thickens up (it should reach 160 degrees for fully cooked eggs, or hold at 140 degrees for 3 1/2 minutes).
  5. Note: This recipe was created using the Vitamix Professionial Series 750, using its “hot soup” programmed cycle. It can be replicated by setting the blender at its top speed and running for a total process time of 5 minutes 45 seconds.
  6. The custard can be refrigerated for up to three days or frozen for longer storage. When defrosted, it will return to the same creamy consistency as when fresh.
Jump to Comments (19)

Comments (19) Questions (2)

Default-small
Default-small
Default-small

about 1 month ago Tina

How long do you think it would last freezer? It sounds so amazing, I want to make a few batches to store! :)

Default-small

8 months ago Vickie

This is out of this world! Used my Vitamix and came out perfect - I can imagine sooo many possibilities with this recipe! Thank You!

Default-small

10 months ago anichila

I made this per the instructions and it worked beautifully on the highest setting of my vitamix. I used Trader Joe's Extra Virgin California Estate Olive Oil for the recipe and topped the custard with freshly whipped cream with maple syrup to counter the tartness. Such an easy and delicious recipe!

Default-small

10 months ago christine

Very easy, very fragrant and flavourful. I garnished with some zest & a touch of thyme.

Open-uri20130809-8222-8in2mb

12 months ago Jessica Scruggs

This was a big hit! I made it with a vegan vanilla cake and served both warm.

Default-small

about 1 year ago sullymorgan

I made this with 1.5 cups of sugar and 4 eggs (more of a traditional curd ratio--at least the recipe usually use). Came out quite thick like a curd and absolutely delicious with the olive oil flavor adding a dimension that butter really doesn't. Going to pair with gingerbread when my dairy free friend comes over. Thanks for a fun idea!

Default-small

over 1 year ago missadventurenaut

I'm pretty certain I had something like this in a tapas restaurant with grilled asparagus. It was heavenly!

Default-small

over 1 year ago gardenchickens

Olive oil in a dessert? In disbelief, I just had to try this immediately, so I used one of my last meyer lemons and Costco Organic EVOO. The flavor combination is a totally delicious surprise. It's a very mysterious blend of flavors, I'd never be able to guess the ingredients. Like others have said, it takes very little to be very satisfying. This would be a perfect filling for a two-bite mini-tartlet. I wonder if a tiny touch of ginger would be good? I have a Meyer Lemon tree in my yard, and I'm delighted to have another recipe to preserve the bounty. This one is definitely a keeper, I know I'll make this again and again when the next ML crop comes in!

Default-small

over 1 year ago acalamar

Really really good especially works for Dr. Who night (fish fingers and custard)

Sadie_crop

over 1 year ago Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

I did, Kristen - it's out of this world!

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Wonderful!

Default-small

over 1 year ago cmcdonn

160º is not that hot -- could you heat the live oil and proceed like blender hollandaise?

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Interesting idea, although I don't think that would guarantee the eggs would reach 160F, if you're concerned about salmonella.

Default-small

over 1 year ago KirstenW

This looks amazing - can't wait to try! Thank you.

Sadie_crop

over 1 year ago Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

Could you use a stick blender?
Also, the note says this was made with a blender that heats the contents. For those without a blender, it says we have to cook the custard. Does that mean those with a blender that does *not* have a heating function should also cook the custard to make sure the eggs are fully cooked?

Default-small

over 1 year ago Kaja1105

I think it's not that the blender has a heating function but that its high speed generates considerable heat from friction. But I have an immersion blender that seems to turn everything into mayonnaise, so I would love to know the answer to Diana's question.

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Yes, our head recipe tester Stephanie actually made this with a stick blender in a bowl set over a simmering water and it worked great.

Miglore

over 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Also Diana, as it says in the first step, if you don't have a high-speed blender capable of generating frictional heat above 160F, cook the custard as explained in step 4.

Default-small

over 1 year ago savvynewyorker

And if you want to use a food processor...?