Maple Oat Breakfast Bread

By • October 1, 2013 • 82 Comments

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Author Notes: A good slice of toast can totally make a breakfast, and this bread - which balances between sweet and savory - makes darn good toast. The recipe is slightly adapted from a King Arthur Flour recipe.fiveandspice

Makes 1 large loaf

  • 5 cups all-purpose flour (you can replace a couple cups with whole wheat if you wish)
  • 11/2 cup rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup (preferably grade B)
  • 1/4 cup melted butter or olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 2 1/4 cups room temperature water
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl and stir well (a couple minutes) to combine into a tacky, messy dough. (You can also use your hands to work everything together.)
  2. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise at room temperature) until poofed and bubbly, 8 hours or overnight.
  3. Gently scrape the dough out onto a well floured surface and shape into a round loaf. Place the loaf on a well floured towel and allow to sit for an hour.
  4. In the meantime preheat your oven to 450F with a 10-inch (about 8-quart) Dutch oven or baking crock with lid in it. When the dough is ready and the oven is hot, turn the dough off of the towel into the hot Dutch oven and cover with the lid. Bake covered for 30 minutes, then remove the lid and continue to bake until the crust is deep brown, another 15-30 minutes.
  5. Remove the bread from the oven, turn it out of the pot and allow to cool completely before slicing.
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Comments (82) Questions (0)

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21 days ago chwood

This is now my go-to bread. Love the ease plus the bonus of the fermentation!

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about 1 month ago GraceL

Made this bread a second time - love how simple it is to put together and the taste. Great toast, keeps well. And right now...a nice way to heat the house for a few hours with the oven on high! Also agree that the parchment paper sling is the way to go. Made the loaf yesterday subbing the oatmeal for Trader Joe's multi-grain cereal (also used 2 cups of ww flour). Worked fine but...I'm having trouble confirming when the loaf is done. It looks quite brown and thumped "done" on the bottom, but is not quite baked through. Any suggestions for keeping the browning under control so that it can bake through?

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2 months ago Laura Willcox

Anyone happen to know if you can use Le Creuset's enamel on steel stockpot for this in lieu of a dutch oven?

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2 months ago Sarah Frances Peck

I used my Le Creuset size 26 'French oven' (oh the marketing techniques) and it turned out great.

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2 months ago jody

This was fantastic!!!..and beautiful.. I will make this a lot. Thank you!!

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2 months ago jody

I am about to put it in the oven..so excited!! Do I need to grease anything first?

Sausage2

2 months ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

I don't, if I'm using cast iron.

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3 months ago Lacie Thorn

Can you use all purpose gluten free flour?

Sausage2

2 months ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

I don't know, but my hunch would be no. Gluten is absolutely critical in giving structure to a yeast bread, and to use a gluten free flour in a yeast bread, you generally have to use a whole different type of recipe.

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4 months ago stephanieRD

Great recipe! I can't say anything else but that it's amazing! Definitely staying in my regular repertoire for sure.

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5 months ago A. Clark

I've been making this for the past several months in a Dutch oven. I find it easiest to turn the dough out onto floured parchment for the one hour rise, and then use the parchment "sling" to put the dough in the pan. Way easier for klutzes like me! :)

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6 months ago yellowbird

Oh my! This wasn't breakfast bread for us, as we dunked and dipped it into apple/pork stew for dinner. Pretty sure we ate more of the bread than the stew.....

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11 months ago Jessica R.

Definitely better the next day.It was still a bit mushy on the inside when it came out the oven. We couldn't taste the maple at all which was kind of annoying since it's so expensive(around 8.00$ a can in Canada).

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12 months ago epicharis

This was fantastic! I used King Arthur unbleached bread flour and couldn't have been happier with the results. Thank you!

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about 1 year ago laurielc

Has anyone made this in a bread machine? I realize it's not the same, but for those times when we want to dump it in and have bread...

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about 1 year ago Jacque

It does spread a bit, but since you dump the dough into pot, it doesn't really matter. And the loafs always come out as if I bought them in a French bakery!

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about 1 year ago Jacque

I have been making variations of this bread for over three years, and I use my Romertopf clay baker instead of a Dutch oven. it works beautifully. Also, I let my bread rise on a silicon baking sheet which is easy to clean and don't stick to the dough. And it is easy to handle when you dump the dough into the hot pan.
No sticking and sizzling

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

That's a great way to do it too. Although, I always have a problem of the bread spreading out too much that way. Do you have any tried and true methods for preventing that?

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about 1 year ago Krusatyr

To prevent spreading, use the floured towel in a proofing basket, cover with another floured towel or plastic wrap. I have a basket that approximates shape of baker. After eight plus hours, roll off risen dough into covered clay baker. I bring a cold oven, cold baker with dough in it up to heat together, others preheat the oven and clay baker before inserting risen dough.

In my humid climate, I can't add sugar or oil to dough, then let it sit out for eight plus hours or it will develop an acrid bacterial taste, not "sour dough", so I cut it in before second rise if I use any at all.

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Isn't it amazing how much climate affects bread baking??!! We live in an extremely dry, extremely cold climate (the average temp since November has been only 3 degrees Farenheit, and it's basically 0% humidity), so I know bread behaves differently here!

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about 1 year ago Sarah Frances Peck

What do you mean, turn the dough off of the towel into the pan? Do you mean to inverse it, so that the part of the dough that was touching the towel then becomes the top of the loaf? I tried that and, unsuprisingly, I wasn't able to get it exactly into the pan. Some of the dough touched the side of the pan where it promptly sizzled and stuck. Then I was reaching into the pan with a wooden spoon trying to move the dough off the side of the pan and get it flat onto the bottom of the pan, which obviously deflated it a bit. :-( How do you get it into the pan, exactly, in a neat way? Thanks!

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

I have to admit, I do the towel thing because most of the no-knead bread recipes I've used and adapted call for doing things that way, but mine usually sticks too and doesn't come out exactly. Usually if it sticks to the side of the pan, I just let it cook there and it comes off in the end, it's just not a perfectly round. I recently bought a banneton, which I flour and use without a towel and that works a lot better. Jacque's trick of a silicon baking sheet works too.

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about 1 year ago pcskinner

To prevent sticking i place my dough in a small skillet sprayed with cooking spray.....since it has a handle it make it easy to invert into the baking vessel. Make sure the skillet you use is a bit smaller than the cooking pot.

Ashley

about 1 year ago Ashley Marie

I'm in love! I replaced one cup of the A/P flour with whole wheat, and used agave nectar instead of maple syrup (only bc I didn't have any). This was not only an extremely beautiful loaf to look at, but tasted so yummy - nice and crunchy on the outside, beautiful, chewy open crumbs on the inside! Such a winner of a recipe! And super easy too! Thank you so much for sharing! I think next time I'm going to try adding some seeds/nuts!

Ashley

about 1 year ago Ashley Marie

Loved it so much I featured it on my blog today! http://supermodelambitions...

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about 1 year ago LucilleF

Just a follow up: my bread rose beautifully! Eight hours and it was ready for the oven. I don't have an enamel pan so I used my Farberware stainless steel Dutch oven and other than the knobs smoking a bit in the 450 degree oven while the oven heated up it worked ok. Also, my bread got too dark(it started to burn) during the uncovered 15 minutes. I think this is because the stainless steel pan is thinner than the cast iron enamel pans so next time I'll try turning down the heat to 400. It might save my pan handles, too. But my bread still looks and tastes amazing. Thanks for an awesome recipe that I will make again and again and......

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about 1 year ago LucilleF

Oops! Just put this together and used active dry yeast but didn't put it in warm water to start. Just threw it in in the order it was listed. But I did use warmer than room temp water when I added the water (maybe 100 degrees). Also, it's cold here in CT also so I have it inside my cold oven. Think this is going to work?

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

I think if you give it enough time to hang out and rise it will work just fine. The yeast will keep working, even if it's cool, they just will take longer. BUT the slower the fermentation, the better the flavor that develops. So, just wait until the dough has gotten fairly bubbly and poofy and then proceed, and I think the bread should be good.

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about 1 year ago Zazie

Just to add a result for those who wanted to try this without a Dutch oven: I'm an amateur bread baker lacking any dedicated bread-making equipment. I don't have a Dutch oven or anything similar, but this recipe looked so tasty I figured I'd give it a shot anyway using only a sheet pan for baking, and I'm happy to report it turned out pretty well anyway. I don't think it was able to rise quite as much, but the overnight rise gave it such a lovely flavor it sort of worked--it's a dense loaf, but lovely nonetheless, and I've enjoyed it with soup as well as for sandwiches.

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Thanks for sharing! That's good to know.

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about 1 year ago beccarichards

My dough didn't rise & become bubbly. Any ideas why? Can I kneed & see if it will rise? Do I need to scrap it and start over? Thanks!

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Hmm, did it not rise at all, or only a little? It may be that your yeast is old and inactive, in which case you'd need to start over. It's also possible that you just have slow yeast and it needs more time, especially if your house is cold.

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about 1 year ago beccarichards

AH, cold house. I meant to mention that. I'm in Chicago and it's freezing. I'm sure inside is suffering from the outside temp. I let it rise all day and it actually has started to rise & nearly doubled in size. So hopefully we're good. Thank you, thank you.

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about 1 year ago beccarichards

Just took bread out of the oven & it's perfect! Thanks for sharing.

Sausage2

about 1 year ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Phew! :)