Fig and Chocolate Oatmeal Cookies

By • December 5, 2013 • 8 Comments

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Author Notes: The original idea behind these was breakfast cookies, but to be honest, I really just decided to make cookies that I felt like eating at that moment. These were they! They were inspired by oatmeal fig cookies from Ana Sortun's Sofra Bakery in Watertown combined with the mind-blowingly good chocolate stuffed (and dipped) figs from Fran's Chocolates in Seattle. They're coast to coast cookies! Then I added coconut too because I had some and it sounded good. It was. I totally did eat these for breakfast. fiveandspice

Makes about 2-dozen cookies

  • 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons salted butter, at room temp.
  • 2/3 cups sugar
  • 2/3 cups dark brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cups rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 9 ounces chopped dark chocolate (I like 70% cacao)
  • 1 1/4 cup chopped dried figs (if they're really dry, soak them in warm water for 10 minutes before using)
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
  1. Cream the butter and sugars together until light and fluffy (3-5 minutes) in a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat until fully incorporated, scraping down the sides of the mixer as needed.
  2. In a separate bowl, stir together all the remaining ingredients. Stir these into the butter mixture on low speed until fully combined with no dry floury patches left.
  3. Refrigerate the dough 30-60 minutes before proceeding. Heat your oven to 350F. Scoop the dough in 2-3 Tbs. scoops onto baking sheets. Bake each sheet one at a time (keep the full sheets that aren't being baked in the fridge until it's their turn) until the cookies are golden around the edges but still look a tad doughy in the middles, about 15-18 minutes, rotating each baking sheet halfway through the bake time.
  4. Let the cookies cool on the sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack to finish cooling.

Comments (8) Questions (0)

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28 days ago shahira

these were awesome but next time I think I might sub half of the butter with the apple sauce trick to reduce calories a bit.. love the combo and added walnuts to half of them

Sausage2

28 days ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Glad you liked them! If you try them with applesauce, let me know how they turn out! That would certainly make them more breakfast-y :).

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about 1 month ago Grace

What happens if I sub Blue Agave for the granulated sugar and cut the butter by 3 tbls? These recipes sound really good, but trying to eat as healthy as possible. Thanks. Grace

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4 months ago Amy Ghiz

Hi, I chilled the dough for over an hour and ended up with super flat cookies, too. The butter-to-flour ratio seems high -- would upping the flour to two cups help?

Sausage2

4 months ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Upping the flour should help. The ratio In this recipe is based on Joanne Chang's oatmeal cookies. I wonder if it works for me because I'm in such an absurdly dry climate! I made the World Peace cookies and Thomas Keller's shortbread the other day and both turned out disastrous. Way too dry, even though I weighed the ingredients!

Sausage2

4 months ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

I'll update the recipe to reflect your experiences, though!

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4 months ago chez_mere

Has anyone else had problems with these spreading waaaaaay too much while baking? I chilled the dough for ~45 minutes as instructed, but they still ended up flat as pancakes. Delicious pancakes mind you.

Sausage2

4 months ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Hmmm, I've never had that problem with this oatmeal cookie base recipe. It does sound like what happens if the butter is too melty. Maybe it got too warm in the creaming process so it needed even more chilling?