Dan Leader's 4-Hour Baguette

By • March 25, 2014 • 147 Comments

1,682 Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!


Author Notes: This recipe is the aggressive, no-more-excuses shove that you need to start baking your own bread. It will only take you 4 hours of intermittent attention, and won't require a starter nor any equipment you don't already own -- and it will rival your favorite bakery's. Adapted slightly from Local Breads (W. W. Norton & Company, 2007) and Saveur Magazine.Genius Recipes

Makes 3 baguettes

  • 1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) tap water, heated to 115° F
  • 1 teaspoon (1/8 ounce) active dry yeast
  • 3 1/4 cups (14 2/3 ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 3 teaspoons (3/8 ounces) Diamond Crystal kosher salt (note: if using a fine-grained salt like table salt, fine sea salt or other brands of kosher salt, you will need to use a smaller volume)
  • Canola oil, for greasing bowl
  • 1/2 cup ice cubes
  1. Whisk together water and yeast in a large bowl; let sit until yeast is foamy, about 10 minutes. Add flour, and stir with a fork until dough forms and all flour is absorbed; let dough sit to allow flour to hydrate, about 20 minutes. Add salt, then transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface, and knead until smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. Transfer dough ball to a lightly greased bowl, cover bowl with plastic wrap, and place bowl in a cold oven or microwave. Let dough rest until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.
  2. Transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface, and shape into an 8-inch x 6-inch rectangle. Fold the 8-inch sides toward the middle, then fold the shorter sides toward the center, like a T-shirt. Return dough, seam side down, to the bowl. Cover with plastic again, and return to oven. Let sit until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  3. Remove bowl with dough from oven, and place a cast–iron skillet on the bottom rack of oven; position another rack above skillet, and place a baking stone or upside down or rimless sheet pan on it.
  4. Heat oven to 475° F. Transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface, and cut into three equal pieces; shape each piece into a 14-inch rope. Flour a sheet of parchment paper on a rimless baking sheet; place ropes, evenly spaced, on paper. Lift paper between ropes to form pleats; place two tightly rolled kitchen towels under long edges of paper, creating supports for the loaves. Cover loosely with plastic wrap; let sit until it doubles in size, about 50 minutes.
  5. Uncover; remove towels, and flatten paper to space out loaves. Using a sharp razor, knife, bread lame, or scissors, slash the top of each baguette at a 30–degree angle in four spots; each slash should be about 4 inches long. Pull out the oven rack with the stone or baking sheet on it and, using the corner of the parchment paper as a guide, slide the loaves, still on the parchment paper, onto the baking stone or pan. Place ice cubes in skillet (this produces steam that lets the loaves rise fully before a crust forms). Bake the baguettes until darkly browned and crisp, 20 to 30 minutes; cool before serving.
💬 View Comments ()

Comments (147) Questions (3)

Default-small
Default-small
Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 month ago beekeeper

My only complaint would be the use of canola oil which is almost all GMO. About the only oil left that is not GMO is olive oil.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 month ago tamater sammich

I believe organic oils would be non-GMO; Spectrum oils, for example. Or you could use butter or coconut oil, as well as the olive oil that you mentioned.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 month ago beekeeper

You are correct. I live in a small town with no access to organic oils so I usually don't think of them. Thanks for the heads up.

A7efd39b-2060-4b49-968c-26cf6859beeb.image

2 months ago Edward

It could be the water you're using too. Try bottled spring water and yeast that has a good use date,if the yeast isn't that fresh you won't get the rise no matter what. The room temperature has a lot to do with the rise also. I've made this recipe proofing it in my microwave,just put it in and close the door. An oven that's gas will work too,the pilot light provides enough heat. Put a small pan of hot water over the area of the pilot light and put the loaves in the oven,it should rise there with no problems. Hope this helps you Jill and Jean! :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago Jean

Mine didn't rise easier, I think I'll stick to the no knead bread, I was so looking forward to this working! Maybe I'll try instant yeast next time.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago Carole Smith

I have baguette molds as well as cloth liners--
I make bread at least once a week and these are always a favorite.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago Jill

My bread did not rise. I have never made bread before so I am clueless as to why that might be? Mine turned out flat and dense but I want to try it again!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago tamater sammich

I love answering questions like this, but at this time I'm swamped with planting seeds in their little pots. So as it seems nobody else has time to answer the question, I'll give you this tip: Google (or DuckDuckGo) "My bread did not rise." There are certain classic thing new bakers do. It's not complicated, and I hope you do it, because I'd hate to see a new baker give up before they get going - fresh bread being the luxury that it is, and it being such an appreciated gift. All the best in happy baking to you!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago Julie

Three common reasons bread doesn't rise:
Inactive yeast - was your water too hot or your yeast too old?
Rise temp too cold - was your room cool? If so, double the rise time.
Too little structure - more time spent kneading

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

3 months ago Emma

Apologies if this has already been answered. I'm totally out of parchment paper - could I use aluminum foil in its place?
Thanks!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

3 months ago tamater sammich

I just mist with oil or lightly schmeer the oil on, and then dust the pan with flour. The first couple times you do it, it might be a little messy, but you'll get the hang of it. You can also sprinkle cornmeal on the bottom, and when you take the bread out of the pan, run your knife around the sides to loosen, and that's fine too.
Yeah, you can use aluminum foil, but tiny bits can stick to the bread, and these can be very hard to see and remove, and you might find yourself asking why you bothered. I try not to use parchment, aluminum, and paper towels, to minimize waste/resources, but do have parchment and aluminum on hand. It's just that thinking about it in advance, I can almost always find a way not to have to use them.

64e7cdca-8349-44fb-ba29-ad0cadb8bfe0.stringio

3 months ago stevemr

Has anyone experimented with different flours or flour brands. The recipe calls for all purpose. How would bread flour change the results? What about store brand all purpose vs high end like King Arthur?

6a3ef8e1-6c10-4531-84ce-43fc9dc5a571.stringio

3 months ago Jacqueline Ogilvie

I used Rogers All purpose, which is a great store brand in Canada. I had no problems with the recipe and the results were fantastic. Hope that helps

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago samaar

I have used store brand flour and King Arthur and the difference has not been too great. Also, I have run out of AP flour and subbed in a cups worth of semolina which I preferred. It makes the bread chewier.

058f30d4-56d8-44ff-8489-211aed305588.stringio

2 months ago Tan Kee Jing

Stevemr bread flour works too. As bread flour has higher gluten, it will hold the structure better and you will end up with a lighter, more airy crumb. However, as most all purpose flour are finer, the texture of your crumb won't be as smooth.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Miles

This is a great and easy recipe. I used instant yeast (saf-instant). I baked one loaf (which we ate), par-baked the second and then froze that and the remaining dough. We baked the frozen par-baked one and while it didn't rise as much as the first - it was still like brand-new home-baked bread. The crust was perfect. Thank you so much!

A7efd39b-2060-4b49-968c-26cf6859beeb.image

4 months ago Edward

I would like for all of you to bake these loaves of bread and send them to me! Thanks! :)

9aa426ef-afe3-4880-b644-ad416b033584.stringio

4 months ago Erik Smith

Good Starting point, but I had to modify it quite a bit to get it to work properly:
10g yeast
10g Sugar
10g Salt
415g Flour
375ml water (heated to 125f)

Cut into 2 loaves (3 basically makes sandwich rolls)
Bake 45 mins

The rest of the processes good. Leads to a nicely textured, flavourful bread.

5c1663d6-7d87-467d-88ad-aaf17ad853ba.onions

4 months ago Rebecca @ DisplacedHousewife.com

I just wanted to say that your directions are exquisite. My eleven-year old daughter made this start-to-finish, by herself, and it was amazing!!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Julie

Active dry yeast won't foam in warm water unless there is a pinch of sugar.

You can bypass the entire yeast-in-warm-water step by using instant/ rapid rise yeast instead of active dry. Use 3/4 tsp of instant yeast in place of the 1 tsp active dry and just stir it into the flour. No need to mix it with water first.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Nelly

Really? Does that really work? Why doesn't everyone just use instant yeast?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Julie

It really does work! Many authors do prefer instant yeast and write recipes that call for it. The only exception might be pizza, where active dry yeast can help make a dough that is easier to stretch into shape.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Nelly

Great, I'll try it! Thank you!!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Vanessa

The main reason people prefer active dry yeast over instant is a greater depth of flavour. I'm not sure how much of a difference it makes, but I like to know that my yeast is still alive by proofing it.
If you're using active dry yeast, definitely put a little sugar* into the water.
*or honey, or juice, or ice cream, or really anything sweet. I've even had melted gummy bears work!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Nelly

Gummy bears? That's hilarious! So you've had honey work for you? I've tried it and it didn't work for me. I'd love to use anything other than sugar. Maybe maple syrup would work?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago Vanessa

I used the honey for a great braided wreath bread, and it was great! Raw honey though, not the stuff in plastic teddy bear squeeze bottles. As for maple syrup, I don't see why not! I'd love to hear how that works out for you if you try it :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

2 months ago Julie

Active dry yeast can produce better flavors than instant - but only if you use the same quantity for both. The reason is that active dry rises dough more slowly, and a slower rise produces more flavor. By using 3/4 the amount of instant yeast, instead of a 1:1 substitution, the rise times are the same, flavor is developed and the bread making process is simpler :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago susan

Wow, this absolutely worked for me, with the kitchen towel rollups and the recipe as is. Great and chewy baguette. I thought it was a lot of salt, but the bread tastes fine. I may decrease it by a little next time and see how it goes. I did make one change - I left the loaves on the parchment and ON the baking sheet in the final rise and then put the whole thing in the oven; I did not do a transfer onto a hot baking sheet as prescribed.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago John

They make a pan for French bread,they work great you don't need a rimless sheet pan or parchment.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

5 months ago Terry

Just finished baking and; thankfully, I had no trouble. I used Rapid Rise highly active yeast (Fleischman's). I also added 1 teaspoon of sugar because so many reviewers had problems with the first step and used this change. The crust is incredibly crunchy! bu I don't think the bread has any flavor. Slathering on the butter works well! I would make these again.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

5 months ago leigh frat

I don't have a rimless baking sheet. Is it necessary to move the loaves to a hot pan that's in the oven?

Thanks.
Leigh

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

5 months ago Amy

I shared this recipe with my Swiss colleagues. One commented that his wife does not like the taste of the yeast here in the states. Is there a recommended brand of yeast or one that is more European in flavor than our standard varieties found in the market? (fleischmanns)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago stardust4300

You can always use instant potato flakes instead of yeast. My friend has Chrohn Disease and we can't use yeast.

18472df7-c243-4a38-9ff4-74429caf0f61.pr

5 months ago Emily Love

As others have stated below, my yeast did not get foamy and (possibly as a result) my loaves did not rise at all! They are long flat hard pancakes as opposed to the beautiful loaves pictured above. Any tips? Would love to be able to add baguettes in to my staple bread recipes.

6d5b9102-92c3-4eee-94b5-a31e1f2789f8.stringio

5 months ago Justcookin

Hi Emily -
Did you check the temperature of the water? I always use a thermometer to make sure. Having the rest of your equipment at room temp should help. If your yeast is fresh there should be no problem. As stated previously, you can add a little sugar -even 1/2 t would help the yeast. You might consider were you had the bread rise - check out methods using the oven to proof or I set it on the top of the stove , covered with the oven on. I hope this helps -

662f4852-3f30-46b5-b1a1-e4e602786b78.img_0086

3 months ago Chris Stone

Sounds like dead yeast--don't let it sit too long; it's worth buying new. And keep it in the fridge.

B8302d16-3435-40de-b652-3576535dd4f3.stringio

5 months ago Janet Kuhn Francis

I made this on a whim. My yeast didn't foam, but it did "work", so I figured it would be okay, and so it was. I did consider adding sugar and might the next time. I also didn't find the dough terribly wet, though I added some flour at each process. Also, since I was kneading by hand, 10 minutes seemed like a LOT of kneading, so I went with the smooth and elastic part, rather than the time. For the salt, I added roughly 2 t of plain old sea salt and I found it a bit bland. I will probably up the quantity and add it with the flour the next time, instead of after. The texture was a bit dense, so maybe more kneading....but the crust was wonderful. Also, I didn't even make it to 20 minutes, at about 18 it was going to be burnt if I left it in any longer. But all in all, delicious, easy, and not so daunting that I wouldn't do it again.

C6e8ab61-82f9-4d9b-8bb5-b2dbea1b5017.10670096_10204013757079238_5680188139348729563_n

4 months ago Genevieve Keller

10 minutes is a standard time for hand kneading. It helps you form the gluten chains that then will allow for the gas pockets to help the loaf rise and make the holes inside.

243cc2d2-c7db-4885-a364-807ae5f774e4

6 months ago Liz Levy

These came out beautifully and tasted excellent. I did have to add almost an equal amount of sugar to the yeast to get it to foam as well as lower the temperature to 100-105 degrees instead of the 115 as stated above. My dough doubled every time except for the last time when in the 14" rolls. They only puffed up just a tiny bit. Once baked, the texture of the bread was thicker and denser (and heavier!) like a Ciabatta instead of the light, gaps of air, french baguette style. Did anyone get the true baguette texture and have tips to share if so?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

6 months ago J

I had the same experience with the first loaf. I saved half the dough in the fridge and tried again a day later-this second loaf was perfect!!! It looked so sad when I put it in the oven, but puffed up within 5 minutes and came out perfect with big holes and excellent flavor/texture!!

7afda1c8-e1fe-4cad-9550-617ff52c551d

6 months ago Ariane Volk

Can someone help with a more detailed explanation? I'm not a native speaker and i'm having trouble interpreting what happens in step 4. Can someone help? "Lift paper between ropes to form pleats; place two tightly rolled kitchen towels under long edges of paper, creating supports for the loaves", like under the baguettes? I don't get it.

6d5b9102-92c3-4eee-94b5-a31e1f2789f8.stringio

6 months ago Justcookin

The "ropes" are the loaves of bread. Place the bread loaves on the parchment paper leaving space between the loaves. Raise up the parchment paper between the loaves of bread and crease them so that the loaves stay long and formed as baguettes. roll up two towels and place them on each end under the parchment paper parallel to the loaves. This will help hold the loaves in place and allow them to raise and stay in the baguette shape. I hope this helps!

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

6 months ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

The step-by-step photos in the article will help too! https://food52.com/blog...

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago tamater sammich

Thanks for that link. Used to be able to get those step-by-step pics by clicking the white > arrows… so what happened, did something change? I have to admit, I'm confused. I wasn't going to bake the bread because of that, and when I read a comment by rebecca, (displaced housewife) saying her 11 year old daughter making the bread, I became, aside from being confused: embarrassed, too!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago tamater sammich

Ok, thanks to the pics, which made everything crystal clear, I'm now heading into step 4 of the process, and it looks like it's going to be a great batch of bread tonight.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

4 months ago tamater sammich

It waa very good. The wettest dough I've ever baked with. So tonight I did another batch, but doubled it, and even though I tried to do exact measurements, it was just a teeny bit less wet. Doubled the loaf sizes, (as opposed to baking 6) baked in long pans, and it's good too. So, ok, it's my new go-to for white flour bread. Or at least my husband says he hopes so. Thanks to everybody including all the great comments.

8406b202-e916-405f-ab46-04a341036c6c.cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

7 months ago Boomdog02

I'm thinking these baguettes are all I need for dinner..with some nice sweet butter and a glass of vino!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

8 months ago John

Hi,I put the yeast in the bowl then add the warm water and wisk it,try addind a teaspoon or less of sugar .Sometimes mine doesn't get foamy but the dough still rises .

58ac134b-0fe1-46f9-bcb9-f5ca60553b04.headshot

8 months ago alidee06

I am really hoping someone can help me. I CAN NOT get my yeast to get foamy! I went through three packets the first time I tried this. I am using a thermometer to reach around 115 deg. and then sprinkling the yeast in. Nothing. I threw away that yeast and bought a different brand. Again, nothing! I have tried tap water, bottled water and filtered tap water. What is going on?! HELP, I just want to make some bread!

5a4f7fd0-0869-45f9-8ccd-b16aa5e221c1.flower

8 months ago Tracie

This happened to me as well. I think my water was too hot even though I used a thermometer. I finally just put warm water in and it finally started to do something. I think I must have been killing it with the hot water.

6c39e401-a5d2-453b-8a57-a6c116647fa1.wrong_apple

7 months ago sevenfaces

Alidee - when I was making another type of bread, I found that sprinkling the yeast over a lesser amount of warm water (1/4 C) and letting it sit without whisking at all seemed to encourage a very foamy result (in general I've found the less I disturb the initial mixture of yeast and water, the foamier my results). I hope that helps, if you can bear to try again!

6c39e401-a5d2-453b-8a57-a6c116647fa1.wrong_apple

7 months ago sevenfaces

I should say, the other bread recipe was 1t yeast : 1/4C water. So in this recipe I think you would need 3/4C to start. Then add the rest of the water when you add the flour and etc.

8406b202-e916-405f-ab46-04a341036c6c.cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

7 months ago Boomdog02

could be H2o was too hot...should be baby bottle warm. Also a sprinkle/pinch of sugar or honey-helps activate the yeast and gets it foamy. I also cover the bowl with plastic wrap while it activates.

B23dc689-738b-44c0-82de-dafd46602cd5.photo_(24)

7 months ago Jenny Ly

I've found that sprinkling a little sugar in my yeast ensures that it gets activated everytime I've tried!

6a3ef8e1-6c10-4531-84ce-43fc9dc5a571.stringio

6 months ago Jacqueline Ogilvie

I use instant yeast for all of my bread making, which you just add to the flour dry. regular yeast is usually activated with warm water to ensure its still viable.

6c39e401-a5d2-453b-8a57-a6c116647fa1.wrong_apple

8 months ago sevenfaces

These baguettes turned out EXACTLY as they look in the photo, an occurrence so rare I actually screamed (for joy) when they came out of the oven! I also had to add a heaped teaspoon of sugar to my yeast to bring it to life, and it was a very very wet dough - I must have added about 1/2C flour in total across the whole process (most of it during kneading) and it turned out beautifully. SO HAPPY with the results. I ate it fresh with jam and cream. :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

8 months ago shellie

Question about the salt. It says "3
teaspoons (3/8 ounces) Diamond Crystal kosher salt (note: if using a fine-grained salt like table salt, fine sea salt or other brands of kosher salt, you will need to use a smaller volume)" -- but is the 3/8 ounces a measure by weight, as opposed to volume? (I think it's weight, since Google tells me that 3 teaspoons is 0.5 oz, and I assume that means volume....) If it's weight, then can we just use 3/8 oz of any type of salt?

C6e8ab61-82f9-4d9b-8bb5-b2dbea1b5017.10670096_10204013757079238_5680188139348729563_n

4 months ago Genevieve Keller

I'm assuming that they're going by a teaspoon measure, not the weight, since the reference to kosher salt would mean that there's a little less salt in the measure because kosher is a flake salt versus granular. (Hence the "use less of a fine grain salt" comment)

87f6ec37-ccbb-4a7f-a0ce-16ff56f3ae81.whisk-only

10 months ago Maddie and Cady (Hungry Curious)

My new go to baguette recipe!

5a4f7fd0-0869-45f9-8ccd-b16aa5e221c1.flower

10 months ago Tracie

Would I be able to make the dough the night before and cook them in the morning?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

10 months ago tracyn

Yes, I did that with mine. After step 2 (folding into an 8 inch square) I put my dough in the fridge so I could bake it the next day. Turned out great!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

10 months ago Ann Guanciale

Perfect...
I will be making this again!
I did add sugar to the yeast as well..

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

11 months ago Chris

Cindy... How much sugar did you use when the yeast/water didnt foam?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

11 months ago Cindy from Canada

I used about a teaspoon (or less). Seemed to be enough.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

12 months ago Cindy from Canada

Re AnnieHynes and epic fail - I had the same problem - water and yeast - nothing happened - thought my yeast was dead - but then added a bit of sugar to the yeast/water and it worked beautifully - this is my new baguette recipe.

7361d116-475e-46b9-ae3c-d9e4786001dd

about 1 year ago Maureen O'Ineedadrink

I tossed a bit of asiago cheese and herbs de provence on top for the last 7 min of one of the loaves. With three you can try out something new on one of them every time.

6a3ef8e1-6c10-4531-84ce-43fc9dc5a571.stringio

about 1 year ago Jacqueline Ogilvie

Made this for Easter Dinner. Amazing and fast. 3 tsp of flaked salt is perfect. No idea if r)3 recipe was wrong before or people were using the wrong kind of salt. Gut this is great. I Agee it's not pretty, but I will take more time shaping the ropes. 1 was perfect by fluck.

6d5b9102-92c3-4eee-94b5-a31e1f2789f8.stringio

about 1 year ago Justcookin

I just used olive oil to grease the bowl and it worked really well!

C764a6f3-393f-40f9-bc65-f13dc99de434.stringio

about 1 year ago Mark Ayers

Everything was glorious until I read the ingrediant canola oil. Why would I want an Industrial Age product requiring solvents to produce from a plant that had traditionally produced fuel oil? There are better alternatives available that are constant with my values.

Still, it loos yummy and I'm sure will be when I've made it.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago pjcamp

Canola is a cultivar of rapeseed, developed through cross breeding to eliminate the bitter flavor. Rapeseed is one of the oldest cultivated plants, used in Japan and China for 2000 years and in India for 4000 years. If you're opposed to the use of hexane as a solvent in the extraction process, then you also have to swear off soybean oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, grapeseed oil, in fact basically every oil except olive, and even then you have to be careful to pass on the pomace oil. On the other hand, Spectrum Naturals produces canola oil with an expeller press and no solvents.

Not sure exactly what your values are unless they involve urban legends and antiscientific attitudes. I am sure, however, that you meant to say "consistent," not constant. "Constant with my values" doesn't mean anything.

8406b202-e916-405f-ab46-04a341036c6c.cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

7 months ago Boomdog02

Jeez...chill out and use olive oil! From the sound of your comment, I expect you've built a mud and soil oven in your yard, fueled only by dead driftwood you find while scavenging the shoreline for shellfish, like early homo sapien.

6d5b9102-92c3-4eee-94b5-a31e1f2789f8.stringio

about 1 year ago Justcookin

Made this yesterday and it was AMAZING! My finicky son (bread aficionado) ate one whole loaf and then some. My husband loved it! Thanks!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago seeabigail

just finished making this! still hot but i'm sure it will taste amazing! any tips on how to make it a bit prettier? i'd love to make them as beautiful as the one in the picture! :)

6d5b9102-92c3-4eee-94b5-a31e1f2789f8.stringio

about 1 year ago Justcookin

Why don't you just use 1T of salt? (3t = 1T) makes it so much easier! My bread was not so sticky. I have it made into loaves and rising! Can't wait to try it!!!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago leanne parcher

Winner, winner, chicken dinner! Wow, love it. I too cheated and used the KitchenAid for the kneading. Last night a loaf with homemade cavatelli. This morning, avocado toast.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago mark dorfman

This is superb. We let the loaves bake an extra minute for a crispier crust.
Use sweet butter and you jave a trip to france in your mouth.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Sue

Can I use instant yeast?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Maya Ruparelia

I did, the bread turned out just fine :)

C0d1a0f4-0340-4b8b-8ee2-ed962c12e6ea.10352194_587464214719106_1027822728714798710_n

about 1 year ago Andrea Young

I made this the first time 2 weeks ago and they came out beautifully - the most beautiful and authentic looking and tasting baguettes I have ever made. Followed the recipe exactly with no problems. Making it again today to go with homemade spaghetti and meatballs. yum.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Lynn

The bread was very tasty but not pretty! It was kinda flat, was it to wet? We froze the last baguette after it was baked and made a pannin with it, amazing!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Maya Ruparelia

Made this yesterday, added 1 1/2 tsp of kosher salt and decided to cheat using the food processor to knead the dough. It was EPIC. Thank you so much for the wonderful recipe! :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago AnnieHynes

Epic fail for me. Nothing rose. I make the no knead sandwich bread every week so I really don't know what went wrong, except the water and yeast never bloomed, no matter what the temp of the water was... I tried everything

385c6cdd-ac2c-418d-8565-261692e2c3e9.img_0007

9 months ago Kt4

The lack of bloom usually means the yeast is dead.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago flourgirl

I loved the idea of this recipe but not the use of white flour so, I substituted 1 cup whole wheat flour and a 1/4 cup dark rye flour for part of the total flour required. I realized I would then need more water (hydration), so I upped the H2O by roughly 1/2 a cup and held my breath that it would be okay....not too sticky to work with (I did everything in a stand mixer). I let the dough sit for the proscribed 20 minutes and seeing that it was indeed very wet, added another 1/2 cup unbleached white flour and let the mixer do the work, which gave me a dough that was not hard to proceed with. All in all, I was very happy with my 3 lovely wheaten baguettes and they did not last long. They were far superior to any I have bought and I will definitely make these again :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Curtis Choppington

I have never made bread before, I have tried this 2 times today and my dough is just so wet an sticky kneading it is a lost cause, I end up with dough gloves. Im weighing the ingredients out but just no luck :(

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago cookbooksareforeveryone

Do not despair. just add some flour as you try to fold….I bet i added another half cup (a bit at each stage.) and it worked great.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago tamater sammich

Dough gloves - That's funny, Curtis! It made me remember when I first learned to bake bread. I think I added an extra 1/4 cup flour. Even though I knew this was supposed to be a wet dough, there's wet and then there's so wet you know it's not gonna work. That just takes experience. Thanks for the laugh!

B9b1b574-8eae-47f9-a4c8-e10222855914.bine_sw

about 1 year ago Sabine@mamangerie

You´re right about the dough gloves (really funny indeed). I had the same problem, such a wet dough at first, but by adding I guess about 1-2 handful extra flour while kneading the bread turned out absolutely fine - after 10-15 min it became the smoothest, silkiest bread dough I´ve ever made (was impressed with myself, or the recipe, or both).

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago smbpc

Made bread on a rainy Saturday afternoon. Excellent results. The dough is quite wet, 122% hydration, so a little hard to handle but very nice crispy loaves with good texture. Makes a rainy day nice.

Ea8ec44b-eb1c-4e34-ae31-7f03b369b334.stringio

about 1 year ago maria.kudla

This was not a good recipe for my carb craving self -- it came out way too good. Don't expect the bread to last past tonight. :-) (PS... I used just slightly less that 3 tsp KOSHER salt. Tastes just right to me.:))

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago pratlir

All this hookah about salt!! Please do no forget that the salt is not put in with the years as the salt will kill the yeast. Put yeast on one side of the flour and salt on the other!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago John

My son is a baker ,he told me to blend the salt in the flour before adding to the yeast mixture.1 1/2 ts of Kosher salt was 3/8 of a ounce

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago lwh02

I think it was originally written as 4tsp, which would make a difference, but even more importantly, all salts don't measure the same....if you weigh it, you should be good. But on the record, 4 tsp of Morton salt is waaaay too much! Learned that one the hard way.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago tamater sammich

I made this bread today, and decided after reading the comments, to go ahead with the 3t. kosher salt, and the bread is wonderful, **burp** I had some while it was still warm, and am now making 'Toad in the hole' as part of my partner's dinner.
Thanks, Dan!
P.S. am wondering if the 'too salty' folks may have used a T. or perhaps miscounted the t.s?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago May

That's a stretch, tamater, to assume those of us who went with 4 tsp are incapable of literacy or basic arithmetic! I think it's perhaps more likely that you came to this recipe well after it had been edited, as it originally called for four teaspoons of some fancy kosher salt, not 3 tsp (or 3/8 ounce), or four tablespoons, or anything else.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago cookbooksareforeveryone

I will add to the mayhem....Weighed everything yeast got a little active(not foamy). Used king A bread flour and then Used the dough hook on my stand mixer for ten minutes and this is the wettest stuff. I added a little flour just to get it to quasi ball. We will see if it rises. Any suggestions? Was it the fancy bread flour? Help?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago kbrown910

My dough was very wet and sticky as well. Added a bit more flour to bring it together. Currently on first rise. Btw: I always use King Arthur flour for my breads

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago May

Is anyone still following this little storm in a bread pan? I had so much dough, by the time I'd doubled it to halve the salt, that I stuck it in a covered bowl in the fridge, and I've been baking a little loaf for breakfast and another for supper for a couple of days.....and it's improved each time! The dough has become chewier, and the crust crispier.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago okaykate

Any thoughts on how this might freeze (and the best way to do it) if I wanted to prep the baguettes but bake them off one at a time?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago John

I found when you freeze the dough the doesn't come out the same.I bake all the loafs off,let them cool then freeze them.When you want a loaf take one out let defrost put in a 425 oven for 5-8 min. it crisped right up.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago okaykate

Awesome - it's as good as fresh baked then? Can't wait to give it a try!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago John

Hi, 8 min .would be to long for this bread,i do it that long for my rye bread. Try 3-4 min. have to see what works for you.

Bf29595e-24df-45f3-bea4-0d8d0d658d26.p1000546

about 1 year ago sofie

Am I the only one that dont get why the dough has to be put in the cold oven to rise? can't it just be left in the bowl on the counter?
Cant wait to make this!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago margothand

Cliff hanger! Something got dropped in correcting the ingredient line for salt because the instructions and closed parens are missing at the end -- after "or" -- where it says: (note: if using a fine-grained salt like table salt or

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Thank you margothand -- I just fixed that, but I'm hoping to clarify the salt amounts even more with more testing.

120fa86a-7a24-4cc0-8ee1-a8d1ab14c725.me_in_munich_with_fish

about 1 year ago petitbleu

I just tried this and am very happy with the results, but next time I will definitely cut the salt by a teaspoon. It's delicious bread, but too salty, and I think the amount of salt may even have impacted the rising capabilities of the yeast. But this is a great starting point! Thanks for sharing!

08461f48-1756-4d9f-a3fa-3102cfa4b09e.jennieinthejungle

about 1 year ago frolicandetour

This was the best bread I have ever made myself! I reduced the salt a bit, but followed the recipe otherwise. I can't stop fussing over how crispy and delicious the crust is, and how soft and perfect the inside turned out...can't stop eating it, either. :)

2ae89659-d0ee-4d48-9695-18c8efe051f8

about 1 year ago peg denton

Salt definitely adds to the flavor of bread, but I was curious why such a large increase, from 1 teaspoon to 4 teaspoons?

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Here's what I posted on the article page, and I just remeasured as well: Unless our scale is off (and I'm working on getting another check!), 10 grams or 3/8 ounce, as this recipe has been published in several places, comes out just scant of 4 teaspoons of Diamond Crystal kosher salt, and we much preferred the results to smaller amounts of salt. If you use a finer grained kosher, sea, or table salt, you should use a smaller amount by volume, the same amount by weight. (Unless you prefer less salt in your bread -- then feel free to decrease, but we liked it this way!)

2ae89659-d0ee-4d48-9695-18c8efe051f8

about 1 year ago peg denton

why did you increase the salt from 1 to 4 teaspoons of salt?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Rivergal

Duh... I asked about the salt then reread the recipe! I got it!

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Rivergal, see step 1!

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Oh, never mind -- I see you got it!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Nelly

I can never seem to get my yeast to foam without adding sugar. And no different with this recipe. Does anyone else have that problem? None of you used sugar in your yeast-water mixture and it foamed? I'd rather not add sugar if it will work without it.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago mikefromholden

Thank you for clarifying the Salt amount. I was puzzled by it since 3/8 ounce came to slightly more 1 tsp in my kitchen.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago mikefromholden

I'm sorry the reply arrows confused me and I replied to you instead of another person.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago cfihunter

Nelly, you don't need the yeast to do a full foam. I did not add any sugar and the baguettes turned out great. I'm actually eating part of one for lunch right now :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Nelly

Really? Ok! I already did a second round adding a tsp of sugar. :( Darn! I've tried many times to make bread with out sugar and it never rises. Then I end up with really dense, stone like rolls.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Nelly

No problem, mike! :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago May

I just posted this on the other version of this recipe here on Food52, but it's worth posting here also:

Good grief!!! I just looked at the Saveur link for this recipe, and it asks for A TEASPOON AND A HALF OF KOSHER SALT, not 4 teaspoons, lol: no small wonder my dough tasted like a packet of salted potato chips!

I made another batch of the dough - salt-free - and mixed the two together, left overnight, and baked this morning, and it was fine. Nothing special, just a regular loaf of bread, shaped like a baguette....

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago mikefromholden

Thank you for clarifying the Salt amount. I was puzzled by it since 3/8 ounce came to slightly more 1 tsp in my kitchen.

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

May and mikefromholden, please see my response above to peg denton!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago May

Got it - thanks, Kristen. It was definitely much saltier than a baguette would normally be, and I used 3 tsp of the salt I have by the stove ("Balein sea salt iodized fine crystals" it says on the blue tub), vs the recommended 4 tsp of Kosher salt in your version of the recipe (I got that substitution recommendation off the 'net - guess it wasn't a good one!). I see that very accurate scales are now on my shopping list. :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago May

Kristen - I'm giving this recipe another go today, having bought better scales, and Mr M and I tried this a couple of times - weighed the salt (normal table salt) and then measured it, and it works out at a hair over 2 tsp.

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Good luck May, and great to know about the table salt.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago May

Ta dah! Turned out perfect - good chew, crispy crust, great taste (that might be our high quality Canadian flour ;) ).

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago Rivergal

I am guessing you add the salt 'just' before putting in oven??

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago A Table Together

I made these today and they are excellent. I followed the instructions, weighed everything, and wow - I'm really surprised these things came out of my oven! A definite keeper. I might cut the salt by 1/2 to 1 tsp, but otherwise - thank you!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago cfihunter

Just pulled this out of the oven. Oh my Hannah is this stuff good. Great recipe. I did cut back a bit on the salt. Only 2 tsps but followed the rest of the recipe. Overall a pretty easy to follow recipe. And samanthaalison, I used a stand mixer for the kneading and only did it for 5 minutes.

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago samanthaalison

If you're using the food processor, is it still 10 minutes of kneading? Should I use the dough blade or the regular blade?

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

In a similar recipe, William Alexander processes for "45 seconds or more, until a ball forms and starting flying around the processor bowl."

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago cfihunter

Now to figure out what else to have for dinner.

Fabe3a82-f4a1-452e-a6e5-e3c8393e49b4.ashley

about 1 year ago Ashley Marie

You don't need anything! Just bread :) HAHA JK - I love serving these cut up into thicker rounds with balsamic vinegar, evoo, fresh basil, tomato slices, fresh mozzarella and a little salt. Put it all on the table and let everyone make their own concoctions! Alternatively you could just put out different cheeses, meats and spreads!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago cfihunter

Wouldn't be the first time we had bread for dinner :)

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago John

ice cubes --good idea I always throw some water on the oven bottom 2 min. after my bread is baking.

70a10452-dfa6-4be6-8cf7-9e986cfbbb23.stringio

about 1 year ago Horto

we are all going to make this and report back
i just started

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago John

can you use all trump HG flour and use a French bread pan ?

40c75dfb-6b9f-4203-9013-a2e40c7b4201.engagement_photo

about 1 year ago Abby @ Happy Food Happy Home

How would you store these? And about how long would they last? I could probably eat three baguettes in a few days, but I probably shouldn't....
Thanks!

Fabe3a82-f4a1-452e-a6e5-e3c8393e49b4.ashley

about 1 year ago Ashley Marie

When I make them, I store them by wrapping them in some parchment paper and then aluminum foil - this probably isn't correct, but Food52 did an article a while back re: proper bread storage that you could Google and read about. We go through the bread pretty quickly in my house too, but I usually end up using one that doesn't "last" for homemade breadcrumbs and / or croutons. I'd say a few days for just cutting off a piece and eating!

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago sasha

Can you use instant yeast? Would you use less than 1 tsp?

Eb515e78-7387-4e72-b91d-acfa26b55b99.default-full

about 1 year ago lwh02

Are you sure the amount of salt is correct?

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Yes, when I tested this, 3/8 ounce came out to about 4 teaspoons of Diamond Crystal kosher salt, which we preferred to the 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt listed on Saveur (they may have used a different kind of kosher salt in their testing). If you go by weight, you'll be safe no matter what!

5886e956-c3cf-4d1d-b809-a36dcef44058

about 1 year ago Diane Var

I'm having trouble understanding the towel concept. Can someone dumb this down for me?

67e07fdb-f802-433a-be05-a9f5ce09568c._dsc3383

about 1 year ago Tammy H

You can see a visual of the towel concept here:

http://food52.com/blog...

C8d0fb81-32c9-4937-82ed-fbb6792b65a0.miglore

about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Diane, I'll post savorthis' great response here too so others can see:

You are just trying to help shape the baguettes while they rise. The towels keep them in place so they are a nice round shape instead of flattened out. The parchment keeps them from sticking together. I actually have a baguette pan that was my dad's- it is two half tubes connected on the long side- and it helps the baguettes rise and bake perfectly.

5886e956-c3cf-4d1d-b809-a36dcef44058

about 1 year ago Diane Var

I have seen the baguette pans you are referring to. Thanks for the help everyone!

0e5c2b73-3f18-46e4-95c9-cbc8af359f65.sadie_crop

about 1 year ago Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

I've got one of these baguette pans, too! Can I just line it with parchment and let two of the loaves rise (and bake) in that?