Slab Galette with Swiss Chard and Gruyère

By • August 4, 2014 • 15 Comments

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Author Notes: This time of year, if you garden or subscribe to a CSA, chances are you have a few bundles of Swiss chard monopolizing your fridge. This slab galette, which could feed over 20 people as a first course, is a great way to put those bundles to use. The dough, a David Lebovitz recipe, is one of my favorites, flaky and buttery with a nice crunch thanks to the addition of cornmeal. Feel free to use the filling as a guide — thinly sliced tomatoes or other sautéed vegetables would be nice additions. The key, however, is to go light — a thin layer of whatever filling you choose is best. Also, the recipe can be easily halved and made into a more traditionally-shaped free-form galette. Alexandra Stafford

Makes 24 slices

Assembling the Galette

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large white onion
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • pinches crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 bunches Swiss chard, stems removed (about 500 grams, post-stemming)
  • 1 Cornmeal Galette Dough
  • 1 cup fresh ricotta
  • 1 cup grated Gruyère or Comté
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon milk or cream
  1. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan or soup pot over medium heat. Add the sliced onion and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Season with a pinch of salt. Add the garlic and pepper flakes and cook for 30 seconds. Pile the chard on top, cover the pan if you are able, and cook for 4 to 5 minutes or until the leaves begin to wilt. Uncover the pan, use tongs to rearrange the leaves and continue cooking the chard until any liquid evaporates. Taste. This is your chance to season the chard, so add more salt if necessary.
  2. Adjust an oven rack to the center position and heat the oven to 375° F. Line a jelly roll pan with with kitchen parchment paper.
  3. Roll the dough on a floured surface into a large rectangle, about 15- x 21-inches or about an inch or two bigger in length and width than your sheet pan. Flip the dough every so often to ensure it’s not sticking. If it is, dust the surface with more flour. Loosely fold the dough in half and half again and transfer it to the prepared baking sheet. Unfold the dough and center it to your pan.
  4. Spread a thin layer of ricotta on the bottom of the dough, leaving a two-inch border all the way around. Spread the onion and chard mixture over top in a thin, even layer. Sprinkle the grated cheese over top. Fold the edges of the dough inward over the filling. Pinch together any tears in the dough. Mix together the egg yolk and milk and brush it over the exposed crust.
  5. Bake until the crust has browned and the cheese has melted, 35 to 45 minutes. Slide the galette off the parchment and onto a cooling rack or cutting board. Let cool for 10 minutes. Cut the galette into 24 pieces. Serve.

Cornmeal Galette Dough

  • 2 1/2 cups (320 g) all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cups (102 g) yellow cornmeal
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces and chilled
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup ice water
  1. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt until blended. Add the chilled butter to the bowl and pulse until it is evenly distributed but still in large, visible pieces. Add the olive oil and ice water and mix until the dough begins to come together. Dump dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap. Roughly shape the dough into a rectangle. Wrap the disk in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. (Alternatively, whisk together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt in a medium bowl. Cut in butter using the back of a fork or pastry cutter. Add olive oil and ice water and mix until dough just comes together.)
Jump to Comments (15)

Comments (15) Questions (0)

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21 days ago Adam

I made this today and it's in the oven right now. I measured the dough ingredients by weight and used a food processor. I patted the dough into a 6"x8" rectangle, wrapped and refrigerated for about 4 hours. I rolled it our straight from the fridge onto a granite countertop I had cooled down with sheet pans full of ice. It was a bit more temperamental than a straight pie dough but I didn't have too many problems. Only one small crack that I easily patched. I followed the recipe exactly, but used a mixture of Comte and Gruyere. It looks and smells fabulous!

Astafford

20 days ago Alexandra Stafford

So happy to hear this, Adam! Very nice work re cooling down your granite counter tops with trays of ice — so smart. I am going to try that next time (which is today because I'm making a German peach pie for a Labor Day bbq...so excited!). Comte is my favorite. Hope it tasted yummy in the end!

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20 days ago Adam

It was so delicious! I brought it to a BBQ with a bunch of friends (everyone was assigned either an appetizer or a dessert). Guess which platter was picked clean first among all the appetizers?? I'll be making it again for sure. Thanks for a great recipe.

Astafford

19 days ago Alexandra Stafford

Wonderful! So happy to hear this.

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24 days ago Somia

I have to agree with enthous - the dough was a nightmare to roll out. It fell apart completely but luckily the pieces can be patched up. Took me back to the days when I used to be terrified of pie dough *shudder*. In the oven now.

Astafford

24 days ago Alexandra Stafford

Such a bummer! I'm so sorry. Questions: Are you using a food processor or hand blending? Is the dough too crumbly or too wet?

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23 days ago Somia

It was totally delish! We and the guests devoured it. But yes the dough felt very dense and wet. I used the food processor and let in sit in the fridge overnight and let it warm up about 15 mins before I could roll it without too much cracking (despite the fact that it felt wet - it keep splitting when I rolled it but I was able to seal it easily as I went along). I think the sheer amount of the dough was also a factor in not being able to roll easily and check for stickiness. I keep flouring and trying to lift the bottom to flour beneath and just gave up at some point. The dough was in 10 pieces when I tried to transfer it - but like I said before it patched up really easily and was completely delicious! Thanks!

Astafford

20 days ago Alexandra Stafford

Oh good, I'm so relieved to hear this! I think you are right: it is a larger quantity of dough than typically is called for in a recipe, so that is one factor, but since you weren't the only one who had rolling issues, I'm thinking I should decrease the water amount to say between 1/3 and 2/3 cup water, and to add water as necessary during the processing. Anyway, thank you for reporting back, and again, so happy to hear it was edible in the end!

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29 days ago Petite fee

Awesome app! In my opinion, since the chard shrink so much during the cooking process, I would cook 3 bunches at least.
THanks for sharing your recette!

Astafford

28 days ago Alexandra Stafford

Wonderful to hear this! I know, isn't it crazy how greens shrink down to nothing?!

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about 1 month ago Ross

This was easy to make and eat. Took it to a party and watched it disappear. My chard plants are pretty funny looking with one stalk standing up on each plant! The poor bunny rabbit from the neighborhood will have to find something else to much on for awhile. Thanks for the great recipe.

Astafford

about 1 month ago Alexandra Stafford

Wonderful to hear this, Ross! We have a bunny in our yard as well and have been out of town for a week — wondering how the garden will look when we get home tomorrow...

Stringio

about 1 month ago enthous

I ran out and bought two large bunches of chard to try this. The only diversion from the recipe I took was to add a splash of white balsamic vinegar to the chard sauté. It was delicious. However, the dough was really unmanageable; much too soft. I'm an experienced cook and have made uncountable amounts of pastry over the years; I measured by weight, not volume, so I'm pretty sure of the accuracy. I was concerned when adding the liquids, as it seemed like an awful lot, but I had faith and dumped it in. The idea of "flipping" the dough after it was thinner than 1/2" was laughable. I must have added at least another 1/2 cup of flour during rolling and still found it impossible to get to the pan as a sheet of dough. The good news is it was fairly easy to press and pat it into place in the pan and it still wasn't tough when baked. Next time I plan on cutting out some liquid or refrigerating it much longer, possibly both. I also didn't get 500 grams of leaves from my two large bunches, so I would like more greens, but it was still good. Those of you with garden chard won't have that problem. It's also delicious at room temperature, which is nice because it makes a huge amount and we had lots of leftovers.

Astafford

about 1 month ago Alexandra Stafford

I'm so bummed to hear this! Also, sorry for the delay here — I've been in WI for a week and haven't had access to my computer. Anyway, I am suddenly worried that my weight measurement for cornmeal is off, and I am so so sorry if it is! I will double check when I get home, but in the meantime, I'm going to remove that figure in case it is. The flour I think is accurate. I'll check back here when I get home and re-weigh. Again, I feel terrible — there is nothing worse than when recipes (especially pastries!) don't work out, and I am especially bummed because this dough is so delicious (seriously, my favorite) when it works out. The cornmeal adds such a nice texture to the dough. Anyway, I love your idea of adding white balsamic to the chard — a little vinegar is always nice with these sorts of greens.

Astafford

28 days ago Alexandra Stafford

Hi again, OK, so I am back home, and reweighed 2/3 cup cornmeal, and it came out to be 102 g, which I think is what I had? So I am stumped as to where the recipe went wrong. My only thought is that flours absorb liquid differently at different times of the year, and perhaps this made a difference? The dough definitely is on the sticky side, but nothing that a sprinkling of flour while you work shouldn't be able to correct, so again, I don't know how to advise. I'm so sorry again for the trouble! Wish this one had worked out for you.