Windfall Fig Confiture

By • September 6, 2009 6 Comments

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Author Notes: The windfall - a friend's fig tree - four pounds of perfectly ripe Brown Turkey figs. A favorite orchardist's clover honey. Aromatic organic lemons. Overgrown thyme in the herb garden. I cooked the confiture into a thick jam and jarred it up in 4 oz. jars. It's going to make a great gift at Christmas. And there were 2 additional 4oz jars that went into the fridge (didn't fit in the canner) and I can't keep my spoon out. I'm thinking as an accompaniment to Stoneyman Gourmet Farmer's Vache/Chevre. Or maybe warmed, spooned over vanilla ice cream.MrsWheelbarrow

Makes six half-pints (or 12 4oz jars)

  • 4 pounds fresh figs
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 cup floral honey, clover, apple blossom, wildflower
  • 3 small, organic lemons
  • 6 sprigs, fresh thyme
  1. Pour boiling water over the figs and let stand for 10 minutes.
  2. Lift the figs out of the boiling water, stem and quarter. Set aside.
  3. Wash the lemons well and slice very thin with a mandoline or very sharp knife.
  4. In a preserving or other 5 qt or larger nonreactive pan, add figs, sugar, lemons, honey and thyme. Bring to a boil that cannot be stirred down, and boil for 10 minutes.
  5. Pour mixture into a ceramic or glass bowl, cover with parchment, and refrigerate overnight.
  6. The next day, bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce and simmer 45 minutes or longer, until it is aromatic and thickened.
  7. Remove the thyme sprigs and fill hot jars with hot jam. Wipe the jars, place new lids and finger tighten rings. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

More Great Recipes: Fruit|Condiments

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