Buckwheat Piadine

By • February 12, 2011 • 5 Comments


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Author Notes: Here's a gluten-free version of the traditional Italian flatbread, a piadina. I love these warmed with some thinly sliced roasted vegetables and a sprinkle of a sharp cheese that melts the slices together.
KateAlice.

Makes 4 small piadine

  • 1/2 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup quinoa flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons milk
  • 4 tablespoons water
  1. Have two sheets of parchment paper ready on your bench. In a large bowl, combine the buckwheat and quinoa flours, and the baking soda
  2. Add the olive oil, milk and 2 tablespoons of water. Mix with a wooden spoon until a dough begins to come together
  3. Add the other 2 tablespoons of water as needed until all the flour is incorporated. I find it easier to mix with my hands; it will be a sticky dough
  4. Divide the dough into either four small or two larger balls. Transfer these to a sheet of parchment paper, cover with the second sheet and use a rolling pin to flatten the dough into discs
  5. Set a lightly-greased frying pan to medium heat. Cook the piadine one at a time, until lightly browned on both sides.
  6. Serve warm: sprinkle with cheese, or make a grilled sandwich with vegetables or sliced meats.

Tags: bread, gluten-free, Italian, savory

Comments (5) Questions (1)

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Imgp2899_2

about 3 years ago KateAlice.

Glad to hear you like the recipe! I've never tried to grind my own quinoa flour. The one I purchase is very fine (like a white flour consistency), so I wonder if grinding it would not quite get it fine enough.

If you don't need it to be gluten-free, perhaps whole wheat flour in place of quinoa? You'd still get the nice strong flavour of the buckwheat coming through. I hope you enjoy whichever version you make:-)

Mrs._larkin_370

about 3 years ago mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

These sound great! I make the plain version, but happen to have buckwheat flour in the pantry! Do you know if you can grind your own quinoa flour with toasted quinoa? I've got tons of quinoa...

Imgp2899_2

about 3 years ago KateAlice.

Glad to hear you like the recipe! I've never tried to grind my own quinoa flour. The one I purchase is very fine (like a white flour consistency), so I wonder if grinding it would not quite get it fine enough.

If you don't need it to be gluten-free, perhaps whole wheat flour in place of quinoa? You'd still get the nice strong flavour of the buckwheat coming through. I hope you enjoy whichever version you make:-)

Buddhacat

about 3 years ago SKK

I ground my own flour a lot using my vita-mix dry container, but friends use their food processors. Also ground my own wheat. You are right to toast the quinoa first as it enhances the taste. I am now going to try this wonderful recipe.

Buddhacat

about 3 years ago SKK

Just a quick thank you for brining up this whole grinding flour idea. Forgot I have toasted buckwheat in my pantry, so I will grind that also.