Bucatini All'Amatriciana

By • August 14, 2013 0 Comments

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Author Notes: Another classic primo that everyone is always trying to get cute with. You really should try it in its purest form, and to truly appreciate the magnificance of the dish, do not substitute with pancetta or bacon. This particular recipe is intentionally light on the tomato to mimic how you would see it in Italy -- I find that most American interpretations add far too much.sumradagnoth


Serves 6

  • 8 ounces guanciale, cut into long, thin, slices
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup homemade tomato sauce (something simple)
  • a generous pinch of red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 1 pound bucatini (or perciatelli)
  • 1/4 cup chopped italian parsley
  • caciocavallo abruzzese, for grating
  1. Bring a pot of copiously salted water to boil.
  2. Add guanciale to a large saute pan and render the fat over low heat. Do not brown the pork - this is important. You want it to be soft and translucent.
  3. Remove meat from pan, leaving the fat. Turn the heat up and saute the onion, garlic and red pepper flakes until beginning to brown. Season with salt, add the tomato sauce and reserved guanciale. Simmer for another 5 minutes.
  4. Cook the pasta 1 minute short of al dente, drain, and add it to the pan. Add a handful of caciocavallo to the pasta and toss. Splash with some of the pasta water if things look too tight. Add the parsley and toss again. Pour pasta into a large serving bowl and grate more caciocavallo over the top, and serve.

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