Chickpea

Faux Tuna Salad (or, Chickpea Salad)

June 17, 2015
Author Notes

For a few years when I was growing up, my mom and I lived near a Subway. We were regular customers and we’d always split a footlong tuna sub. Although I professed to hate mayonnaise at the time (I’ve since learned the error of my ways), that sub was a notable exception. I loved the smooshy tuna salad—scooped out with an ice-cream scoop—that was as much mayo as it was tuna. I no longer eat tuna, but my love of smooshy sandwich fillings lives on with Faux Tuna Salad Sandwiches.

There are now a million variations of this around the interwebs, and I don’t remember where I first was introduced to the idea, but I’m grateful to them all the same. I no longer measure ingredients when I make this, I just add blops of stuff as I go along, but these measurements should give you a starting point until you figure out your personal blop-size preferences. Also, I’ve found this is toddler-friendly fare if I skip the onions and don’t add hot sauce. —Lindsay-Jean Hard

  • Serves 2
Ingredients
  • 1 15oz can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped dill pickle or cornichons
  • 1 teaspoon pickle juice
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
  • 1 tablespoon mayonnaise
  • splash of hot sauce (optional)
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Put chickpeas in a medium-sized bowl and smoosh them with a fork. You don’t have to get every single one, but you want most of them to be broken up.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and mix.
  3. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary (you might need a little more lemon juice, etc.).
  4. Split between 2 sandwiches or use as a cracker topping (choose a sturdy type, like Triscuits).

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I like esoteric facts about vegetables and think ambling through a farmers market is a great way to start the day. My first cookbook, available now, is called Cooking with Scraps.