Lamson

Fish Turner with Walnut Handle

$34
Fish Turner with Walnut Handle
Lamson

Fish Turner with Walnut Handle

$34
Free Standard Shipping on Orders $99+

A kitchen classic.

Every well-equipped kitchen needs a slotted turner, that spindly-looking metal spatula whose cutouts make it extra lightweight and far less likely to damage delicate foods on the pan. This fish flipper from Lamson is just that and more: It's also razor-thin, with a beveled edge that allows it to slide easily right under tender fish filets or seafood cakes, paper-thin crepes, and just-set eggs (steer clear of nonstick cookware, though). Plus, the durable stainless-steel head makes this tool just as handy for heavier-duty jobs, like lifting a burger off the grill—the slots allow grease to drain—or even cleaning your pizza stone. The walnut wood handle adds a touch of natural color and has a good weight for balance, so you can keep on flipping on.

Fun fact: Lamson Cutlery is so embedded in American history that some of their knives are on display at The Smithsonian. We got to talk with the makers and learn more about their legacy of nearly 200 years—needless to say, they’re pretty impressive.

  • Made in: Westfield, MA
  • Product Warranty:
  • Shipping & Returns: Free Standard Shipping on Orders $99+ and Easy-Breezy Returns

Every well-equipped kitchen needs a slotted turner, that spindly-looking metal spatula whose cutouts make it extra lightweight and far less likely to damage delicate foods on the pan. This fish flipper from Lamson is just that and more: It's also razor-thin, with a beveled edge that allows it to slide easily right under tender fish filets or seafood cakes, paper-thin crepes, and just-set eggs (steer clear of nonstick cookware, though). Plus, the durable stainless-steel head makes this tool just as handy for heavier-duty jobs, like lifting a burger off the grill—the slots allow grease to drain—or even cleaning your pizza stone. The walnut wood handle adds a touch of natural color and has a good weight for balance, so you can keep on flipping on.

Fun fact: Lamson Cutlery is so embedded in American history that some of their knives are on display at The Smithsonian. We got to talk with the makers and learn more about their legacy of nearly 200 years—needless to say, they’re pretty impressive.

A kitchen classic.

Every well-equipped kitchen needs a slotted turner, that spindly-looking metal spatula whose cutouts make it extra lightweight and far less likely to damage delicate foods on the pan. This fish flipper from Lamson is just that and more: It's also razor-thin, with a beveled edge that allows it to slide easily right under tender fish filets or seafood cakes, paper-thin crepes, and just-set eggs (steer clear of nonstick cookware, though). Plus, the durable stainless-steel head makes this tool just as handy for heavier-duty jobs, like lifting a burger off the grill—the slots allow grease to drain—or even cleaning your pizza stone. The walnut wood handle adds a touch of natural color and has a good weight for balance, so you can keep on flipping on.

Fun fact: Lamson Cutlery is so embedded in American history that some of their knives are on display at The Smithsonian. We got to talk with the makers and learn more about their legacy of nearly 200 years—needless to say, they’re pretty impressive.

  • Made in: Westfield, MA
  • Product Warranty:
  • Shipping & Returns: Free Standard Shipping on Orders $99+ and Easy-Breezy Returns

Every well-equipped kitchen needs a slotted turner, that spindly-looking metal spatula whose cutouts make it extra lightweight and far less likely to damage delicate foods on the pan. This fish flipper from Lamson is just that and more: It's also razor-thin, with a beveled edge that allows it to slide easily right under tender fish filets or seafood cakes, paper-thin crepes, and just-set eggs (steer clear of nonstick cookware, though). Plus, the durable stainless-steel head makes this tool just as handy for heavier-duty jobs, like lifting a burger off the grill—the slots allow grease to drain—or even cleaning your pizza stone. The walnut wood handle adds a touch of natural color and has a good weight for balance, so you can keep on flipping on.

Fun fact: Lamson Cutlery is so embedded in American history that some of their knives are on display at The Smithsonian. We got to talk with the makers and learn more about their legacy of nearly 200 years—needless to say, they’re pretty impressive.

Meet the Maker

Lamson

Westfield, MA
Lamson have been making knives for a very long time: since 1834, to be exact. Their pieces are exquisitely hand-crafted from the finest materials -- even President Ulysses S. Grant was a fan. Nearly two centuries later, they're still a cut above the rest.
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