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All questions

Common/Clear Flour

Where else besides KAF might I be able to buy Common/First Clear Flour? This is a type of flour and not a brand.

asked by BurgeoningBaker over 2 years ago
14 answers 3315 views
Dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 2 years ago

You can easily make your own. On my blog I have a post about how to use a Pearson's Square to calculate how much you need of 2 substances in order to create a third containing both of them. Basically, you need to boost the protein content of bread flour (12.5% usually) in order to create clear flour of about 15.3% protein, by adding vital wheat gluten. I went ahead and did the calculation for you. However much clear flour you need, use 96% bread flour sifted together with 4% vital wheat gluten. You can find VWG in the bulk bin section of any natural foods store. Take a look at my blog post and read the section on how to figure the protein content of something. Pre-packaged VWG tends to be lower in protein than that in bulk. I don't know why that is, but it might be a good idea to be sure of the protein content of your VWG. Hope this helps you.

Dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 2 years ago

Sorry, forgot to include the link: http://wp.me/p27pPl-9J

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added over 2 years ago

I'm not sure that that high protein flour is the same flavor wise. Since it is generally whole wheat with more bran I believe. Have searched bakeries but so far nothing fruitful.

Scan0004
added over 2 years ago

There is a flour called 'high gluten flour' which is used to make bagels. "Vital wheat gluten" is highly concentrated on the protein of the wheat. Neither one is whole gran, and neither one has bran. What I know as 'whole wheat with more bran' is one of the several flours sold as 'graham flour.'
Both ChefOno and boulangere are professionals whose recommendations I would trust.

Waffle3
added over 2 years ago

Thank you for those words of respect. I've been feeling a little unappreciated the last day or two. More below…

Waffle3
added over 2 years ago

You could try your local restaurant supply and have them order it. Might have to buy a 50# sack though.

Waffle3
added over 2 years ago

Some bakers claim you can't make a proper Jewish-style rye without first clear flour, a specific type of white hard wheat flour. Part of the issue is protein content which can be addressed as boulangere suggests above. Part has to do with flavor and color, both of which come from the inclusion of parts of the bran.

There's a description here:
http://www.theartisan.net...

Scan0004
added over 2 years ago

ChefOno, thank you for that link. It's detailed and clear.

BurgeoningBaker, it may help for you to give more information about what you are planning to bake and where the recipe comes from.

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added over 2 years ago

I was trying to make a Rye bread from a Rye Sour. I understand the need for higher protein content and to that end was not discriminating against Boulangere blog post only to say that from my reading that First Clear flour apparently imparts some flavor profile (along with strength in protein) that just a high protein flour mixture would not. I also wasn't discrediting ChefOno as the instructions I was using found here

http://www.cyber-kitchen...

States to search out bakeries which ChefOno also suggested and to which I have received all negative replies as stated.

At the current time, I've gone ahead and ordered two orders from KAF until I, hopefully, can find a local purveyor.

Thank you all for your helpful replies (perhaps thats what was missing from my previous post). For further note, I have access to VWG in bulk and High Gluten Flour. Though the information given will also be useful when I revisit a bagel recipe I saw on The Fresh Loaf.

Waffle3
added over 2 years ago

I apologize, BurgeoningBaker, for the misunderstanding. My comment about feeling unappreciated was a reference to another thread and had nothing whatsoever to do with you. Good luck with the bread.

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added over 2 years ago

So going back to that recipe I have another questions. This is my first time using and trying to keep a starter going. I have the recommended 1/4-1/2 cup saved starter in the fridge.. I was rereading this paragraph

"It is best to stir down the starter every 3 to 4 days if
unused. Periodically (every 10 to 12 days) dispose of half
and refresh it by mixing in equal amounts of flour and water
If there is some discoloration on the top, it can safely be
skimmed off and the sour used as normal. When going away
for long periods of time, I freeze a small amount of sour.
When preparing a new starter from scratch, I add the frozen
sour to preserve my original culture. To ensure the proper
strength of the sour, in each stage you can only double the
amount of starter you begin with. For example, if beginning
with 1/4 cup starter, you can add up to 1/2 cup water plus
flour to thicken. If Stage One contains 1 cup sour, Stage
Two can be prepared with up to 2 cups water plus flour. If
a large amount of sour is required, extra stages can be
added. "

Given the way the recipe goes and considering how much starter I saved. Is that meaning that it is equal parts water and flour when going through the stages or do I follow the recipe as it is written. I was a little confused with at what point do I change from doing equal flour and water to following the recipe as it is written.

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Ron
added 10 months ago

In order to simulate first clear flour without actually having it, I think the best answer is to take whole wheat flour and sift out the bran, which will still leave some smaller bran particles in the sifted portion. You then add 8% vitan wheat gluten to the sifted whole wheat flour and you'll come very close to "first clear," with the protein boosted and a moderate amount of fiber as well.

So, for example, assume you sift 110 gm of whole wheat and end up with 100 gm of sifted whole wheat flour (around 11 grams of protein). Add 7 grams of vital wheat gluten (at 65% protein), adding another 5.2 grams of gluten, for a result of around 16.2 grams of gluten for the 108 grams of flour. Resulting percent: 15%. If you'd like to go a little over 15%, just add 9 or even 10 grams of VWG to the sifted whole wheat flour.

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Ron
added 10 months ago

Sorry, there were a few typos in my answer. Corrected version:
In order to simulate first clear flour without actually having it, I think the best answer is to take whole wheat flour and sift out the bran, which will still leave some smaller bran particles in the sifted portion. You then add 8% vital wheat gluten to the sifted whole wheat flour and you'll come very close to "first clear," with the protein boosted and a moderate amount of fiber as well.

So, for example, assume you sift 110 gm of whole wheat and end up with 100 gm of sifted whole wheat flour (around 11 grams of protein). Add 8 grams of vital wheat gluten (at 65% protein), adding another 5.2 grams of gluten, for a result of around 16.2 grams of gluten for the 108 grams of flour. Resulting percent: 15%. If you'd like to go a little over 15%, just add 9 or even 10 grams of VWG to the sifted whole wheat flour.