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Pie Crusts

Every year, when I make pumpkin pie, my crust is SOGGY before we get through 1/2 of the pie. WHY? How can I correct that problem?

asked by Terri W. almost 2 years ago
3 answers 648 views
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Monita

Monita is a Recipe Tester for Food52

added almost 2 years ago

Do you pre-bake (ie "blind bake)the crust before filling it and baking it. It sounds like the crust may not be baked through.

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added almost 2 years ago

Try 1) blind baking the crust for 10 minutes or so before adding the filling and 2) warming the filling to about 130 F before adding it to the blind-baked crust. That way, the wet filling spends less time in contact with the crust before it fully cooks and sets.
This recipe uses the same idea, but it works with any filling: http://food52.com/recipes...
Alternatively, you could eat the pie faster! A certain amount of sogginess WILL happen over time; not much you can do about that.

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added almost 2 years ago

With any pie/tart crust if I feel there may be possible sogginess, I brush the shell with a mixture of egg white, sugar & water. I do this twice whilst blind baking and it produces a slightly crisp shell that holds up beautifully with any juicy or damp filling.