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Freekah

Has anyone cooked freekah? It is a green (immature) wheat that has been roasted. I have found some recipes on the web, including one from the NY Times, but I am wondering of anyone has a traditional family recipe.

asked by Maedl over 1 year ago
9 answers 1082 views
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em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 1 year ago

I absolutely love freekah. I first had it at an Israeli restaurant in Philly and bought some right afterwards. I don't have a traditional family recipe but made and enjoyed this dish one night: http://em-i-lis.com/wordpress...

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added over 1 year ago

Emily, that sounds so good. I love greens and have saved the recipe to make later in the week.

Susan.streit
carbonarasuz

Susan is a Recipe Tester for Food52

added over 1 year ago

Freekah is a delicious grain! You can substitute it in place of any grain, such as rice or quinoa, to mix things up a bit. It's wonderful hot as a side dish, or cold in a salad. If you live in the NYC area you can also buy it the Greenmarkets from Cayuga Pure Organics, http://www.cporganics.com....

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em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 1 year ago

Thanks, maedl!! I hope you enjoy it- let me know!! :)

Scan0004
added over 1 year ago

On food52: http://food52.com/recipes...
Your question makes me wonder about its history... time to find out.

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added over 1 year ago

Susan, there is an excellent summary of freekah's history in Breaking Bread in Galilee by Abbie Rosner. She lives in Israel and early in her time there became fascinated with the Arab and Palestinian foods. She made a concerted effort to get to know these people, go with them to gather wild plants, learn about traditional agriculture and and their food traditions. I highly recommend it. It is on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Breaking...

Flower-bee
added over 1 year ago

I have been thinking about trying to prepare it in a light cheese sauce of some kind that would complement the smokiness of the grain itself- adding a smoked cheese only in reverse....Uncomplete yet though.

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added over 1 year ago

Emily, I tried your recipe for dinner this evening and it’s fantastic! I love greens, and I’m sure freekah is eaten with wild plants that are foraged in Israel and Lebanon, so your recipe seemed authentic enough. I put a hunk of goat’s milk feta on top, since I was eating the freekah and greens as a main course.

In southern Germany, we have a very similar grain called Grünkern, which is spelt harvested while it is still green. It comes from a small region on the Würtemburg-Bavaria border and is also smoked, following a method very similar to freekah. I buy it frequently and usually use it in soup, but never noticed the smoky flavor like I did with the freekah.

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em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 1 year ago

Hi Maedl, I'm so happy to hear from you and happy too that you enjoyed your meal. I love the idea of goat's milk feta on top (or at anytime!). :) Thanks so very much for writing back and for the note about Grunkern too. I love hearing about ingredients from around the world, and the ways in which they're similar or not, to ones others grow and use. Thanks again!!