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13 answers 31614 views
Buddhacat
SKK
added about 3 years ago

When canning meat a pressue canner (not cooker) is necessary. I can a lot and would not risk trying to preserve this.

Dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 3 years ago

Eugenia Bone, I love your flashes of brilliance here.

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bjw
added about 3 years ago

I LOVE bacon jam.
Agreed as suggested in the other posts that you need a pressure canner. I found your blog while searching this exact question; thought I coule share the answer I found:
1/2 pint jars at 11 lbs psi for 75 minutes
Source: http://creativecanning...

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added almost 2 years ago

Would it be possible/safe to change the PH by adding vinegar at the end and using a boiling water canner?

Buddhacat
SKK
added almost 2 years ago

Absolutely NOT. Please look at the answer from Eugenia Bone, which is the second answer. She is an expert and explains why not. You must use a pressure canner.

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added almost 2 years ago

Good advice. I've never used a pressure canner before and I'm intimidated. I'm trying to borrow one to see if it is something I could get used to. Any pointers about how to use a pressure canner for Bacon Jam?

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added about 1 year ago

I tried pressure canning the bacon jam I made today, but it came out kinda burnt. Isn't pressure canning bacon for 75 mins too much for the meat? I read somewhere that pork can be pressure canned for about 8 mins because its such a tender meat.

Fsm
added about 1 year ago

Just curious - Since bacon is a cured meat and subject to fewer/different bacteria issues than say fresh cooked meat, would it need to be canned at a different temperature and/or time to un-cured pork?

Eugenia_bone_copy
Eugenia Bone

Eugenia is the author of the book Well-Preserved. Her new preserving book, The Kitchen Ecosystem, will be published in 2014.

added about 1 year ago

Brittany: The USDA/university extension offices provide data for canning various foods, but I haven't seen one for bacon jam. So that puts the canner in the less than ideal situation of having to estimate pressure canning times. Your estimate of 75 minutes was the same that I would have used, the same as meat strips (pork and beef are processed the same amount of time. Tenderness is not the issue, pH is). I wouldn't process for less time. But maybe you can cut the timing shorter during the precooking stage. Trampledbygeese, when it comes to pressure canning, you don't alter the temperature--it's 10 lbs at sea level and more as you rise in altitude--but the time. So can cured pork process for less time than uncured pork? Without data to determine that answer, I'd err on the side of safety.

Fsm
added about 1 year ago

Thanks for explaining Eugenia. I have to admit, I never even considered canning meat before. I usually just freeze, cure, dry or a mixture of the above. I do have a pressure canner I use to use for apple sauce. But now I'm interested and have a lot of goat meat coming my way....hmmm, something to think about.

Going to go check the seals on my pressure canner before I think too much further.

Eugenia_bone_copy
Eugenia Bone

Eugenia is the author of the book Well-Preserved. Her new preserving book, The Kitchen Ecosystem, will be published in 2014.

added about 1 year ago

Trampledbygeese, I think you will find pressure canning meat to be safe and easy. I put up lots of stuff, but on a regular basis, chicken and beef stock, which process for only 20 minutes (10 lbs at sea level), and lately I've been putting up beef stew and mailing it to my son in college. He loves it!

Fsm
added about 1 year ago

I'm sure it's very safe - I just never thought of it because I don't like the texture and taste of commercial potted meats... but I can can stew? Now that might be something worth trying.