Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Cookies

By • January 9, 2014 • 9 Comments

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Author Notes: This recipe is reprinted with permission from Kim Boyce's Good to the Grain.Kim Boyce

Makes about 20

Dry mix

  • Parchment for baking sheets
  • 3 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

Wet mix

  • 8 ounces (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, roughly chopped into 1/4- and 1/2-inch pieces
  1. Place two racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment. Although you can butter the sheets instead, parchment is useful for these cookies because the large chunks of chocolate can stick to the pan.
  2. Sift the dry ingredients into a large bowl, pouring back into the bowl any bits of grain or other ingredients that may remain in the sifter.
  3. Add the butter and the sugars to the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. With the mixer on low speed, mix just until the butter and sugars are blended, about 2 minutes. Use a spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing until each is combined. Mix in the vanilla. Add the flour mixture to the bowl and blend on low speed until the flour is barely combined, about 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.
  4. Add the chocolate all at once to the batter. Mix on low speed until the chocolate is evenly combined. Use a spatula to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl, then scrape the batter out onto a work surface, and use your hands to fully incorporate all the ingredients.
  5. Scoop mounds of dough about 3 tablespoons in size onto the baking sheet, leaving 3 inches between them, or about 6 to a sheet.
  6. Bake the cookies for 16 to 20 minutes, rotating the sheets halfway through, until the cookies are evenly dark brown. Transfer the cookies, still on the parchment, to the counter to cool, and repeat with the remaining dough. These cookies are best eaten warm from the oven or later that same day. They'll keep in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Jump to Comments (9)

Comments (9) Questions (2)

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about 1 month ago durun99

These have supplanted our long-time favorite chocolate chip cookies. Having made them numerous times, here are a few observations, some based on the comments below. (1) They are not too large. If you make them smaller, you are missing out on one of the defining characteristics of these incredible cookies: crisp edges and chewy middles. (2) You may be tempted to substitute packaged chips for handmade chunks (as I have done in a pinch). Resist the temptation. Packaged chips have an added ingredient to help them hold their shape, which defeats one of the purposes of hand cutting the chocolate: the gooey pools of goodness you get if you eat them warm, as Ms. Boyce suggests. Also, hand cutting produces tiny shards of chocolate that get dispersed throughout the dough if you mix as instructed in step 4. (3) I do not find these too wheaty, as one person comments, but I use King Arthur white whole wheat flour (3 cups = 12 ounces for people using a scale), which has a more subtle flavor than traditional whole wheat flour.

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11 months ago Goldie

I love these cookies and they are now our family's go-to cookie recipe. Delicious, nutty and totally more-ish. I make them smaller than she recommends but apart from that, I totally follow the recipe. I have some in the oven right now!

Stringio

11 months ago Donna Shirley

any nutritional info available?

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11 months ago Stephanie G

These are the only chocolate chip cookies I make since buying this book. I think they taste divine.

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11 months ago jedi

I really didn't like these. I liked the concept, but, the whole wheat (used King Arthur) overpowered any of the "dessert" aspect. Somehow the sweetness just didn't come through for me, and there was a bad taste at the back end. I don't mind using some whole wheat flour in recipes, but the white flour does help the balance.

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11 months ago ONaturelle

crcmen; cut the cooking time to between 14 - 15 minutes if you're using coconut oil.

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11 months ago crcmen

Wow…I'll have to try it your way!

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11 months ago ONaturelle

I'm calling this concept a mega-winner. Because we're watching carbs, I immediately cut the sugar. I omitted the white sugar completely, instead adding JUST 1/1/4 cups of dark brown sugar. I also substituted coconut oil for the butter. I used Venezuelan 70% couverture pastilles. The result was startling. I've never made a cookie with whole wheat flour. I'm so chuffed; I can't fathom anything better!

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11 months ago crcmen

I found these cookies had very little flavor, were a bit too greasy and are just too large.