Our little rice cooker, now in red + brass for the holidays. Shop the exclusive »
🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

My beef borginon has been cooking and it's still the consistency of soup even thought followed the recipe. How do I thicken it?

Tyler Florence recipe

asked by AvecYou almost 3 years ago
24 answers 1898 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

How much time do you have before serving? Boeuf bourguignon tastes better when refrigerated for 24 hours or more before re-heating and serving so if you're not serving it tonight, no problem. Going to look for Tyler Florence's recipe...

19f2e275 c635 488f 8322 530158a23e00  food52
added almost 3 years ago

As a general rule of thumb for myself... any time I am doing a good braising recipe (such as beef bourguignon), I plan to do the actual braising the day before. Let all the ingredients sit in the refrigerator before straining and finishing the sauce.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

This is the Tyler Florence recipe I found on www.foodtv.com:
http://www.foodnetwork...

If it's the one you're following, the problem I can see (and it's mentioned in a few of the reader comments I glanced through), is that it doesn't call for long-enough cooking time. Simmering stove-stop at 45 minutes is not enough. It needs about two hours in the oven at medium heat, say 325 or 350. That will give the beef enough time to release its collagen (jelly-like stuff which causes thickening of the sauce), as Benny explains - plus sugars from the vegetables, etc.

I could offer some ideas for thickening it up but it would help to know if you planned on serving this tonight.

The FoodTV web site doesn't make it easy, but if you read through the comments, there are quite a few that explain "I had to cook this much longer than expected..." etc.

Are you trying to serve this tonight?

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

Just a small personal tantrum, but I find this so annoying. If you are gifted with TV shows and cookbooks and fame, the least you could do is publish a reliable recipe.

I will write down my grandmother's recipe for Boeuf Bourguignon which she learned first-hand from Dione Lucas when Dione had a cooking school in New York City. It will take me about a week because it takes time to write a decent recipe.

19f2e275 c635 488f 8322 530158a23e00  food52
added almost 3 years ago

this is one of those recipes which people can be given the same set of ingredients and the same recipe, and still come out with different versions. I personally don't think the dish needs any "sugar to balance out the acidity of the wine." also, I marinate the meat in the wine, mirepoix and bouguet garni for a few hours first. Be sure to dry it before seasoning and browning of course :) As stated above, best to let the braise sit in the refrigerator over night. looking forward to seeing your grandmother's version!

21cce3cd 8e22 4227 97f9 2962d7d83240  photo squirrel
added almost 3 years ago

b, agree w/ you about the sugar. i can see a pinch in a big pot of marinara but i feel strongly that americans use way too much sugar, in everything, and the chefs in the media need to set a better example for the public that they influence. (Every time i say something like this i can't help but flash back to Mrs. Owens making the same statement in 1965 about the Beatles and Norwegian Wood and later about Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds...
ah, what goes around comes around, eh?!))

Anyway, the concept of putting the beef in wine before you assemble the BfBourg- that's quite a neat touch (both imbuing the beef w/ more flavor AND making the beef more tender because the acid in the wine will break down the muscle fibers.) That technique never occurred to me before, so thx for that,B!

21cce3cd 8e22 4227 97f9 2962d7d83240  photo squirrel
added almost 3 years ago

b, agree w/ you about the sugar. i can see a pinch in a big pot of marinara but i feel strongly that americans use way too much sugar, in everything, and the chefs in the media need to set a better example for the public that they influence. (Every time i say something like this i can't help but flash back to Mrs. Owens making the same statement in 1965 about the Beatles and Norwegian Wood and later about Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds...
ah, what goes around comes around, eh?!))

Anyway, the concept of putting the beef in wine before you assemble the BfBourg- that's quite a neat touch (both imbuing the beef w/ more flavor AND making the beef more tender because the acid in the wine will break down the muscle fibers.) That technique never occurred to me before, so thx for that,B!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

Benny, I'm perplexed about your comment:
"this is one of those recipes which people can be given the same set of ingredients and the same recipe, and still come out with different versions."

There is nothing similar about what I responded, to what TF's recipe prescribed.

Please let me know what is similar about 45 minutes on stove-top vs. 2 hours in the oven.

19f2e275 c635 488f 8322 530158a23e00  food52
added almost 3 years ago

just a general comment. wasn't directed towards your response at all.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

Oh! oops, my bad. Sorry, I need to read more slowly!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

AvecYou, I hope you got some kind of help here. You haven't responded about when you plan on serving, but I'd be happy to help walk you through a few different options, but it depends on the day. In any case, you are making one of the best dishes ever. Cheers.

21cce3cd 8e22 4227 97f9 2962d7d83240  photo squirrel
added almost 3 years ago

avecyou, yes this stew, as most beef stews, is better the day after. Regardless of that, I always make a roux and add that to thicken the stew to my liking.(My BB comes from Julia Child.)
Not knowing the quantity of liquid you are wanting to thicken, I would advise melting one stick of unsalted butter and whisking in 1/2 cup of flour. whisk/stir this for 4-5 minutes to cook out the raw flour taste. Now you have a base, a thickening agent. you may not need it all but it's cheap to make and you can keep it to use later. Now, just to be conservative (safe) put aside half of the roux. Leave half of the roux in its pan, on low heat, and add to it 1 cup of liquid from your stew pot, whisking continually to incorporate it well and not have 'lumps in your gravy'! Repeat whisking in more liquid til it is like gravy. Now, whisk all this into your big pot of stew. Stir well, bring to boil and turn down to simmer. Is it thick enough? If not, keep repeating the process til you have the thickness you want. I am a 'quantity cook', always making big batches of anything stewlike, to portion and freeze for the future. Sometimes defrosted stews are thinner than they started and this roux technique is what i use when i defrost and reheat them.

8f5038ed 8aca 4d33 aef7 8a0ce63adc40  img00019 20100929 0432 1
sexyLAMBCHOPx

Chops is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

I would add a simple slurry, as Benny noted and cook it for 2-3 more hours.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

Le Bec Fin, I hope you received my email. Maybe it was sent to your "Junk" or "Spam" email box?

21cce3cd 8e22 4227 97f9 2962d7d83240  photo squirrel
added almost 3 years ago

Well darn, peg, nothin' rcvd, inbox or spam. did you try the cottonarboretum email?

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

sexy lamb chops - In my experience, if it hasn't braised in the oven for a few hours, there is not necessarily any reason to add flour.

8f5038ed 8aca 4d33 aef7 8a0ce63adc40  img00019 20100929 0432 1
sexyLAMBCHOPx

Chops is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

I haven't looked at the recipe, so im sure you're right if it has thickening agents to do so without the slurry.

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

One problem I saw at once with this recipe is that there is too much liquid called for. That's more than half a gallon! My Boeuf B recipe has 3 cups wine (one bottle) and 1/4 cup Cognac. Big difference. Considering you already have all that liquid in, I would follow Le Bec Fin's suggestion for thickening. In the future, I wouldn't use the beef stock.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

June, to that end, another option for AvecYou is to remove about 1/2 of the liquid and simmering it down in a separate saucepan until there is only about 1/3 left, then adding that back into the main pot.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 3 years ago

Make blurred Maine = kneading equal parts butter & flour together and to sauce

Wholefoods user icon
added almost 3 years ago

Haha! I like "blurred Maine," that is a new one to me! For anyone unfamiliar with the technique they should search for beurre manie. Great tips, all! I am very distrustful of recipes from the Food Network and their chefs, excepting Alton Brown. And besides, this is such a great community of serious cooks who love the world of food.