All questions

Can you freeze the chicken fingers? (Recipe by Merrill https://food52.com/recipes/23253-chicken-fingers)

Can you freeze the chicken fingers in this recipe by Merrill?

asked by Sarah D almost 3 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

3 answers 5184 views
Lindsay-Jean Hard
Lindsay-Jean Hard

Community Editor at Food52

added almost 3 years ago

Hi Sarah, I asked Merrill about them, and she hasn't even tried to freeze them. I'm sorry to not be of much help, but please report back if you try it!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

sexyLAMBCHOPx
sexyLAMBCHOPx

Chops is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

Yes, you can freeze chicken fingers. After cooking, let cool. Place the cooked tenders in a Ziploc bag or something freezer safe making sure to get out as much air possible. They should keep for about a month or so. When you ready to cook, place the frozen tenders on a baking sheet and bake at 375 for approx 30 minutes.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

1071292522
added almost 3 years ago

My guess is that one can freeze them with a moderate amount of success. After all, the chicken fingers in the frozen aisle of your supermarket are basically the same: cooked breaded chicken.

The home cook is likely at a disadvantage here though, since commercial food processors have access to certain machines (IQF = Individual Quick Frozen) or techniques (fast freezing) that a home cook won't.

Also, commercial food processors will carefully formulate recipes to optimize them for a high-quality product that is intended to be frozen, defrosted and reheats. That was not Merrill's intent.

Of course, commercial food processors can include special additives (healthy or not) to improve product quality.

Ultimately, it's up to you to try to freeze, defrost, reheat, and try on your own.

This is the same with almost anything one freezes. Some things survive the defrosting/reheating process better than others. Ultimately, you're the one who has to be happy with the end result. What might be good for some people may not be good for someone else.

This can be applied with almost anything you put in your mouth. Some people are perfectly happy with a plastic box of supermarket sushi that was made two days ago; others only eat sushi when they are seated in front of the person who is making it.

The next time you make a batch, try freezing one or two pieces.

Good luck.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)