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6 answers 875 views
byb
byb
added almost 2 years ago

Hi there! While the pan will eventually become (quite) non stick, it will take some time and usage to get there. The best thing you can do is cook a lot with it (foods like bacon are great for it) and take good care of it (don't wash with soap, dry immediately and oil).

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cv
cv
added almost 2 years ago

Read this first:

https://www.cooksillustrated...

There are other ways to season cast iron pans, the Internet is full of suggestions.

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ktr
ktr
added almost 2 years ago

I agree with bye. I have 2 cast iron pans and several cast iron pots. with my first pan I tried to season it by rubbing it with oil and baking it. I found that simply using the pan was the best way to season it. Don't be afraid to add butter, oil, lard, or grease to the pan when cooking - it will help it become more nonstick over time. And don't scrub at it with steel wool every time you clean it or you can take the seasoning off (my husband may have done that to my favorite pan that I had seasoned beautifully)

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Shuna Lydon
Shuna Lydon

Shuna is a pastry chef in New York City and author of the acclaimed blog Eggbeater.

added almost 2 years ago

There are a number of ways to skin this cat. Yes, cooking in it over many years will make it "nonstick," but if you can't wait that long - every time you have 30 minutes to spare, wipe pan with clear oil (canola, sunflower, peanut etc.) & bake in over at super high heat. The more times you do this, the more "coating" you build up. After you use it, try to use as little or no water to clean it. Sometimes I use a lot of kosher salt - rub it with a tea towel, and rinse salt out. Then I'll put it on flame, medium heat, to dry it, then wipe it all over with clear oil, and leave it on burner until it's slightly smoking. When not in use, keep cast iron pans in oven.

Never cook anything liquid or acidic in your cast iron skillet. It can remove many layers of that which you've worked so hard to form.

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Kees Spruit
added almost 2 years ago

I agree with Shuna Lydon. her advice is practically the same as was given to me 45 years ago as i started to work in a kitchen. It works. At least for me.

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Sean R
added almost 2 years ago

Imma just leave this here, an excellent article from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt of Serious Eats: http://www.seriouseats...

The "What You Should Do" section is helpful as well!

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