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how do i make garlic infused olive oil

I have a lot of garlic and want to use it to make infused olive oil

asked by lotsoscots 6 months ago
29 answers 503 views
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Nancy

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added 6 months ago

There are bunches of recipes out there, as you can see from this google collection (or should I say, on a food website, collation):
https://www.google.ca/webhp...
But I would not make a large quantity, unless you know you'll use it up soon, because of dangers, including botulism, in keeping home-infused oils longer than 2-3 weeks.
https://extension.umaine...
and other articles
https://www.google.ca/webhp...

So, my suggestions
1) use some of your garlic for infused oil to use at home and/or give now as gifts.
2) chop and freeze the remainder now, use in recipes later.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 6 months ago

In Thai Cuisine they take chopped garlic and let it gently fry in oil for a few minutes until it is golden brown. Take out the garlic and let it cool on paper towels. Use the oil in all dishes that need a kick. It will last you a few weeks in fridge.

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PHIL

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added 6 months ago

I made a small batch in the microwave, chop up the garlic small , zap it for a few minutes, and let cool. you can strain it out or just put some , garlic chunks and all on some bread. Nice with some fresh rosemary mixed in if you have it. the garlic bulbs will keep in a cool dark place so no need to use it up in one shot.

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Susan W

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added 6 months ago

Ben's idea is a great one. Jean-Georges' fried rice recipe has you toast garlic and ginger until golden. You end up with amazing oil and delicious garlic and ginger to top the rice. I never thought to make it in large quantities, but it's an awesome idea.

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HalfPint

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added 6 months ago

I make garlic oil in the slow cooker every so often. Just take peeled whole garlic, throw into cooker, cover with a neutral oil like regular olive oil (not extra virgin), and cook on low for 3-4 hours. It sort of makes a garlic confit. In the end, you get garlic flavored oil to use in your cooking and soft sweet cooked garlic that can be spread on toast or added to any number of sauces, soups, or entrees. No worry about botulism since everything is heated. I freeze the whole garlic and keep the oil refrigerated. It lasts for months.

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added 6 months ago

Mexican mojo de ajo is made by covering the bottom of a pan with whole peeled garlic cloves and covering it with olive oil- something like 2c. oil to 4 large heads garlic. It is baked at 325 for 45 min- 1hr., until the cloves are lightly browned; strain out the garlic.. For Mexican dishes, lime juice and some sort of chile is generally added.

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Susan W

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added 5 months ago

This sounds like Rick Bayless mojo. Tasty for sure. Have you tried Heidi Swanson's? It's a little different with fresh o.j. added along with the lime. Delicious!!

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added 5 months ago

That's probably where I first got it- " ...One Plate at a Time" was my main sort-of-watch-it-while-finishing-dinner show when it was on at 4:30 (my father's a million years old and likes dinner at 5:00. Exactly.)

730e314f caf5 438f 9a9a 998057ffb9ff  20151109 150352
Susan W

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added 5 months ago

Lol Smaug. I can't wait until I am a million years old and get to say what time dinner needs to be served. Exactly.

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added 5 months ago

I just trow some sliced raw garlic cloves in the virgin olive oil. No need to cook, much healthier.
As long as the garlic is completely covered by the oil it will not go bad. I sometime add rosemary, thyme or hot chilly. If the oil goes low I top it up. I use it raw for seasoning about anything.

Voted the Best Answer!

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HalfPint

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added 5 months ago

Not true. Botulism can grow under anaerobic conditions (i.e. In the absence of oxygen). Garlic, since it is grown in soil, naturally has botulism spores attached to it. Ordinarily this isn't a problem to worry about. Cooking garlic will kill the spores or putting in acid (like vinegar). Storing raw garlic in oil is not a safe practice. The garlic may not "go bad " but the botulism can grow even when covered in oil.

05ecb292 9c62 4e50 b630 a898cae237ad  laura avatar s size
added 5 months ago

The garlic flavours the oil within hours, and I usually use it within the week. I rather not frying it, if necessary I rather boil it.

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Susan W

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added 5 months ago

This has FDA info. Botulism thrives at room temp or a refrigerator that isn't cold enough. It's quite dangerous to store garlic in oil and in your first post you say you "top it off when it gets low". Eek... Just trying to keep you a healthy and safe guardian chef. :)

Throwing in some garlic into olive oil is a popular salad dressing, especially since many commercially-made dressings use variations on it. However, many might not realize how dangerous it can be if proper precautions are not taken in its storage and preparation.
As for home-prepared mixtures of garlic in oil, the FDA recommends that these “be made fresh for use and not left at room temperatures.” Any leftovers should be refrigerated for use within three days, frozen for longer storage, or discarded.
The reason for the concern is that unrefrigerated garlic in oil mixtures lacking antimicrobial agents have been shown to permit the growth of C. botulinum bacteria and its toxins, without affecting the taste or smell of the products.
Toxin production has been known to occur even when a small number of C. botulinum spores were present in the garlic. When the spore-containing garlic is bottled and covered with oil, an oxygen-free environment is created that promotes the germination of spores and the growth of microorganisms at temperatures as low as 50 F.

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added 5 months ago

Susanw thank you for your concern but I do keep it in the fridge. I am Italian and use a lot of raw virgin olive oil seasoning on salad, vegetables and pizza. The container will be empty within a salad seasoning, so I top it up daily. I often do it in an almost empty English mustard container which is actually very small. I sometimes add lemon juice. In Italian is called Salmoriglio.
Just to clear the air I double checked and 1 week in the fridge it is not dangerous, especially if there are some other acidic component in it like salt or lemon.

05ecb292 9c62 4e50 b630 a898cae237ad  laura avatar s size
added 5 months ago

Just my opinion, but this scare of botulism is frighting people away from healthier homemade seasoning and salad dressing like mayonnaise or vinaigrette.

I never keep food longer than 3 days or 1 week in the case of salad dressings. If I do homemade preserves I make sure I follow all precautions directive to the last details.

I always make everything from scratch and use only fresh seasonings, daily!

Ketchup or any other industrialized infused oil or salad dressing will never find a place in my kitchen.
Whatever is in these products might not be botulism, but I am not interested.

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ktr
added 5 months ago

I have never made garlic infused olive oil, but if you are simply looking for a way to store a large amount of garlic and keep it from going bad, pickled garlic is easy to make and will allow you to keep the garlic for months.

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PHIL

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added 5 months ago

Susan W - good point. not worth the risk. I forgot about the freezing option. I do it with herbs, chimichurri and pesto all the time in ice cube trays.

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Susan W

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added 5 months ago

After this conversation, I'm now in the mood for garlic and ginger oil (toasted..not raw) which I think I'll freeze a portion of. I'm curious to see if it freezes solid. I'll be using grape seed oil or possibly olive oil.

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added 5 months ago

Susan, Thank you for the information. One clarification I would like to hear though - does or does not heating the garlic as in the slow cooker method kill the botulism? I would think not since it is a concern in canned green beans which have been processed, but would like confirmation.

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Susan W

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added 5 months ago

I'm sure 3-4 hours in the slow cooker is enough to kill the botulism (that would be 185 degrees on low and probably 200 degrees on high), but I'm going to see if I can find what temperature and for how long is necessary.

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Nancy

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added 5 months ago

C Sangueza - maybe have a look at the University of Maine article I cited in first comment above. Seems the issue is not heat but acidity (which will prevent C. bot. from growing). Article has good tips.

730e314f caf5 438f 9a9a 998057ffb9ff  20151109 150352
Susan W

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added 5 months ago

Well, so far, I've seen everything from anything above 200 degrees kills the toxin, but not the spores to kills the spores and toxins, but it has to be above 250 for ten minutes to it has to be cooked at 400 degrees or above. Those all just came from opinions from cooks and not from an extension service from a university or FDA. The easy answer is introduce enough acid, but I'm not interested in that. I'll keep looking.

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HalfPint

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added 5 months ago

@Susan W, UC Santa Barbara says 120C (248F) in a pressurized system will kill the spores. 10 mins at 212F (boiling) will kill the toxin. So any cooking for ~10 minutes will take care of the toxin. The spores aren't a problem until they start to germinate and produce the toxin. And spores will germinate under low oxygen conditions. That's why throwing raw garlic & fresh herbs into oil without any heating or acid is risky.

730e314f caf5 438f 9a9a 998057ffb9ff  20151109 150352
Susan W

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added 5 months ago

HP, I was just coming back after seeing UCSB site and info. My question is would 4-6 hours at 200f be sufficient? I'm not seeing that from a reliable source. They all say 212f or above. Maybe that's just splitting hairs, but the slow cooker I would use doesn't get higher than 200-205f. Does the length of time make up for the difference? Just curious.

Also, does your garlic brown a little or just become soft?

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HalfPint

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added 5 months ago

@Susan W, based on what I read from the Colorado State U Extension, http://extension.colostate...

I'm inclined to think that 4-6 hours at 200-209F is sufficient to inactivate the toxin, though not make a dent in the spores, but the spores are not a problem until they start to germinate.

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Susan W

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added 5 months ago

HP, good deal. I'm convinced. :)

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HalfPint

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added 5 months ago

@Susan W, forgot to add. My slow cooker garlic softens but doesn't brown. It is almost greyish in color, but very soft and sweet.

730e314f caf5 438f 9a9a 998057ffb9ff  20151109 150352
Susan W

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added 5 months ago

HP thanks. I kind of figured as much. One of my slow cookers (I have 3...it's a flaw) reaches 225f on high, but I'll be using my small one for this and it reaches 205f on high in 4 hours.

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AntoniaJames

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added 5 months ago

Great idea, HalfPint. Thank you! ;o)