Sheet Pan

Mustard Pecan Crusted Chicken with MapleĀ Glaze

March 24, 2012
Author Notes

Succulent chicken breast is dipped in a frothy egg white and Pommery mustard, then coated with a crunchy pecan and Panko crust, sauteed in sweet butter and glazed with maple. Straightforward and simple but it never failed to bring raves in my 30 years catering business. I love that it is low fat and needs no sauce because it is so flavorful on its own. And while I love it hot and crispy, it is still great as a cold dish on a picnic.( It was adapted long ago from another recipe, I have no idea what that was.)

Good starch side partners include things like buttercup squash and sweet potatoes. —LE BEC FIN

  • Serves 8-10
Ingredients
  • 3 pounds boneless skinless chicken breast, tenderloins removed so breasts are of even thickness
  • 4 large egg whites(1/2 cup) with few pinches kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup Pommery Mustard*
  • 2 1/2 cups ground pecans, medium grind (not fine)
  • 2 1/2 cups Panko or fresh baguette type bread crumbs
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2-1 pounds unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/2-1 cups Grade B Maple syrup, heated
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Place cookie rack on sheet pan. Combine 1/2 the pecans and bread crumbs in a low dish. By hand or in a Kitchen Aid ,whisk egg whites and salt until foamy and beginning to lose yellowness. Transfer to smaller bowl and quickly and gently fold in Pommery mustard with spatula.
  2. Dip both sides of chicken breasts in egg white mustard mixture and then press down thoroughly into pecan bread crumb mixture. Refill nut/crumb mixture as needed. Sprinkle w/ S and P. Place chicken on cookie rack and let chill at least 1 hour.
  3. Saute chicken on both sides in butter, til crunchy brown and juices run pale pink when meat is skewered. Brush very generously w/ warm maple syrup. Serve.
  4. Notes: Pommery is a must here (uh oh, an unintentional pun.) The best is Moutarde de Meaux in the red lidded crock, though it is expensive. Dijon just doesn't cut it here. (uh oh, another one!)
  5. This chicken is still delicious as a cold leftover, but it loses its crisp crunchiness.
  6. Notes: The amount of needed egg white and pecan coatings can vary a lot depending upon the size of your chicken pieces. If you use chicken tenderloins ,or cubes or strips of chicken for hors d'oeuvre skewers, because surface area increases, you may end up needing more of the coatings. For 12 ounces of chicken tenderloins, I used 1/4 cup egg whites, 2 1/2 Tablespoons Pommery mustard; 1 cup pecans and 1 cup Panko.
  7. This is a perfect use for those lefover egg whites taking up freezer space (they last forever in the freezer.)

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  • LE BEC FIN
    LE BEC FIN
  • inpatskitchen
    inpatskitchen
Review
I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.