Make Ahead

Strawberry Apricot Breakfast Crisp

June 25, 2013
Author Notes

Leftover crisp makes such a good breakfast, why not make a crisp specific for breakfast?! This one is full of early summer flavors as well as wholesome oats and nuts. —fiveandspice

  • Serves 4-6 (doubles well for more breakfasts)
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup hazelnuts
  • 1/2 cup rolled oats
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons cold, salted butter, cut into chunks (cold coconut oil works well too)
  • 1/3 cup honey (or maple syrup)
  • 6 apricots, pitted and quartered
  • 8 ounces strawberries, hulled and quartered
  • yogurt of your choice, for serving
  • lemon zest and/or thinly sliced fresh basil, for serving
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Heat your oven to 400F. To make the crisp topping combine the hazelnuts with 1-2 Tbs. of the oats in a food processor and process until they reach the consistency of a coarse flour. Keep an eye on it to make sure you don’t process it all the way into a paste.
  2. Add the remaining oats, salt, cold butter, and honey and pulse just until a chunky mixture forms.
  3. Combine the quartered apricots and strawberries in a baking dish large enough to hold them in a thick layer (I usually use a gratin dish or a pie plate). Drop spoonfuls of the topping evenly over the top of the fruit.
  4. Bake in the oven until the fruit is bubbling and the topping has browned, about 30 minutes. Allow to cool, then store in the refrigerator and dole out for breakfasts over the following days.
  5. Serve a scoop of crisp (you can warm it up a bit first, or eat it cold) with a couple scoops of yogurt and top with a little sprinkle of lemon zest or sliced fresh basil.

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  • Kris
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Review
I like to say I'm a lazy iron chef (I just cook with what I have around), renegade nutritionist, food policy wonk, and inveterate butter and cream enthusiast! My husband and I own a craft distillery in Northern Minnesota called Vikre Distillery (www.vikredistillery.com), where I claimed the title, "arbiter of taste." I also have a doctorate in food policy, for which I studied the changes in diet and health of new immigrants after they come to the United States. I myself am a Norwegian-American dual citizen. So I have a lot of Scandinavian pride, which especially shines through in my cooking on special holidays. Beyond loving all facets of food, I'm a Renaissance woman (translation: bad at focusing), dabbling in a variety of artistic and scientific endeavors.