Cast Iron

Tad's Roasted Potatoes

January  8, 2010
Photo by James Ransom
Author Notes

Last year, after having spent 5 years testing recipes (with Merrill!) for a cookbook, it was time to actually sit down and write the book. I did so in the evenings, which meant that my husband, Tad, took over cooking dinner. Tad is the type of cook who prefers to find a few recipes he likes and master them so he can get in and out of the kitchen and back to reading the paper as quickly as possible. His piece de resistance is roasted potatoes, which he makes in a cast iron pan with lightly smashed whole garlic cloves and whatever herbs are in the fridge. He blankets them with olive oil, scatters on coarse salt and coarsely ground black pepper and then sticks the pan in a hot oven. They're delicious every time. Once when preparing the potatoes, though, Tad used some white potatoes that had been in the fridge for, oh, a month, give or take a few months. When the potatoes came out of the oven, they were as brown as a chestnut, with a thick, glistening crust, and as sweet as candy—far outpacing any version he'd made before. The secret, we eventually learned, was the old potatoes. As potatoes age, their starch turns to sugar, making them denser, softer and easier to caramelize. —Amanda Hesser

  • Prep time 10 minutes
  • Cook time 40 minutes
  • Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 3/4 pound old white potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
  • 1 splash olive oil
  • 8 sprigs herbs (any combination of thyme, sage and rosemary)
  • 2 garlic cloves, skins left on and lightly smashed
  • 1 pinch coarse salt
  • 1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Heat the oven to 375° F. Spread the potatoes in a 12-inch, well-seasoned cast iron pan—they should fit comfortably in one layer. Douse with olive oil, like you're marinating them. Add the herbs and garlic, and season generously with salt and pepper. Toss the potatoes a few times to mix in the herbs and seasoning.
  2. Roast in the oven, scraping up and turning the potatoes every 10 minutes or so, until the potatoes are well caramelized and tender, about 40 minutes.

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Review
Amanda Hesser

Recipe by: Amanda Hesser

Before starting Food52 with Merrill, I was a food writer and editor at the New York Times. I've written several books, including "Cooking for Mr. Latte" and "The Essential New York Times Cookbook." I played myself in "Julie & Julia" -- hope you didn't blink, or you may have missed the scene! I live in Brooklyn with my husband, Tad, and twins, Walker and Addison.