Mediterranean Sumac-Seasoned Chickpeas with Sardines

By • March 31, 2014 0 Comments

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Mediterranean Sumac-Seasoned Chickpeas with Sardines


Author Notes: A one-pan savory mix of "roasted" chickpeas, dark leafy greens, sardines, and eggs. It's like visiting Spain with Captain Superfood. Great for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, and easily modifiable (sometimes I skip the egg, or scramble it in, or use chard instead of kale, or don't have yogurt, etc). I especially love it for breakfast or brunch, though - it's a great way to add some variety to your morning routine, only takes about fifteen minutes to make, and it wakes you up without being too heavy. The sumac brightens everything up, and the combination of lemony and smoky flavors is really fun. I invented it because I always have sardines and chickpeas in the pantry and it seemed like a good idea at the time - it's become a favorite breakfast in our house, making an appearance a couple times a month!Katie E. Clark

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Serves 2

  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 15 ounces chickpeas
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder (no salt added)
  • 2 teaspoons dried sumac
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 3.75 ounces canned sardines
  • 2 ounces canned anchovies
  • 3 handfuls kale, torn
  • 1/2 lemon
  • 2 eggs
  • cracked black pepper (to taste)
  • 1/4 cup plain greek yogurt (optional)
  1. Add coconut oil to deep pan or wok over medium-high heat. Rinse chickpeas, and pat or drain to dry.
  2. When oil is hot but definitely not smoking, add the chickpeas. Add 1 tsp each of garlic, sumac, and paprika, and let it all sizzle for about five minutes. (This is up to you on the zestiness scale - I personally add whatever amount feels good; if I'm in a milder mood then I take it easier, but 1 teaspoon is the average.) You may also use fresh garlic, but a garlic powder with no added salt tends to create a better crunch. Don't stir it after this for about seven minutes; allow the bottom of the chickpeas to pick up a nice dark crust.
  3. Drain and rinse sardines and anchovies zealously (you can use any kind you want, but I like the kind that are tinned in olive oil with as little salt added as I can find - just really make sure that all the oil you can rinse off is gone; otherwise everything will have that weird fishy taste, and not the good kind). Tear off about three handfuls of curly green kale, and tear it into small pieces (about dime sized) - if you want everything to cook faster, avoid the ribs and just use the curly parts of the leaf.
  4. Stir the chickpeas, add the sardines and anchovies, and allow the fish to warm up for about a minute, then break it apart with a fork. The anchovies will pretty much melt themselves in, so don't try too hard. Add the remaining garlic, sumac, and paprika, and give everything a good stir.
  5. Stir occasionally, and when the kale is fairly soft (depending on how well-cooked you like it), clear out a hollow in the middle of the pan, making a little well about four inches in diameter.
  6. Crack two eggs into the hollow. Season with cracked black pepper to taste. If you did a good job then let the eggs cook over-easy. If you did a less-than-perfect job and broke an egg (or both), then let them cook most of the way and then stir them in.
  7. Separate the fish/chickpea/kale mixture into two bowls and top with an egg each. (If you ended up basically scrambling in your eggs, then congratulations, you are done early and this step just got way easier.)
  8. Top with a dollop of plain greek yogurt, if you like, and finish it with a little cracked black pepper and a squeeze of lemon.

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