Make Ahead

Summer Bounty Frittata

September  1, 2014
Author Notes

Throw all your favorite summer vegetables into a frittata and you have a fantastic and simple meal. —fiveandspice

  • Serves 4 to 6
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 red onion, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup red bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 1 small zucchini, chopped into 1/8 inch-thick rounds
  • 1 ear of corn, kernels removed
  • A handful of cherry tomatoes, halved
  • A couple basil leaves, thinly sliced
  • 6 large eggs
  • Salt and pepper
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. In a medium (around 9-inch) oven-safe skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat until it is shimmering. Stir in the onion and bell pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until they have softened and browned, around 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the zucchini rounds and corn kernels and cook until softening, about 3 minutes. Add the cherry tomatoes and basil leaves plus a couple pinches of salt and pepper and give a stir.
  3. Turn the heat down to medium-low and let the veggies hang out until the tomatoes just start to soften, a minute or two. During that time, in a medium bowl, whisk the eggs with a few pinches of salt and pepper and turn your oven broiler on.
  4. Pour the eggs over the vegetables and let the frittata cook until it is most of the way set, but the top is still uncooked, then transfer the frittata to the oven and broil just until the top is cooked. Remove from the oven. This frittata can be served warm, room temperature, or cold. It’s good with a salad and really yummy sandwiched between pieces of bread, especially with some pesto.

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  • Sophie Wallerstedt
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  • beejay45
    beejay45
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I like to say I'm a lazy iron chef (I just cook with what I have around), renegade nutritionist, food policy wonk, and inveterate butter and cream enthusiast! My husband and I own a craft distillery in Northern Minnesota called Vikre Distillery (www.vikredistillery.com), where I claimed the title, "arbiter of taste." I also have a doctorate in food policy, for which I studied the changes in diet and health of new immigrants after they come to the United States. I myself am a Norwegian-American dual citizen. So I have a lot of Scandinavian pride, which especially shines through in my cooking on special holidays. Beyond loving all facets of food, I'm a Renaissance woman (translation: bad at focusing), dabbling in a variety of artistic and scientific endeavors.