Simple Braised Carrots

By • March 28, 2015 0 Comments

0 Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!

Author Notes: Braising may sound fancy, but it’s really not. It’s basically just browning the food, then cooking it in a little liquid until done. You can do it with meat, vegetables, whatever.
In this case, the end result is deeply flavored, naturally sweet, and perfectly cooked carrots that taste just as good as they look.
Amanda Waddell


Serves 2-3

  • 5-6 large carrots, washed (no need to peel, especially if using organic)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme or whatever herb you like (oregano, coriander, etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 cup vegetable or chicken broth (or water)
  1. Slice your carrots in half and put the smaller ends aside. Slice the larger (stem) ends in half lengthwise.
  2. Add the oil to your cast-iron pan or a large saucepan and heat until very hot but not smoking. Place the carrots in the pan, arranging those you sliced in half flat side down. You want as much of the carrot’s surface to touch the hot pan as you can, so you get a nice sear (searing = flavor).
  3. Let the carrots sizzle and brown for at least 5 minutes, checking periodically and turning as needed. (The good thing about using cast iron is that when the food is properly seared, it releases naturally from the pan, so don’t move the carrots unless they’re ready to go.) Flip to brown both sides.
  4. Once browned, sprinkle the carrots generously with salt and pepper and whatever herb you’re using. Drizzle the honey over the top of the carrots. Slowly add your liquid (I really prefer homemade chicken broth here, but it’s totally up to you); It will sizzle and deglaze the pan a bit. The liquid should come just about halfway up the sides of the carrots. Turn the heat down to a simmer and partially cover.
  5. Cook the carrots for 20 to 25 minutes, turning as needed and adding a bit more liquid if it becomes too dry (though it’s okay if most of it evaporates). Test for doneness with the tip of a knife—it should pass through the thickest part of the carrot without much resistance when done.
  6. Serve warm, with a little balsamic vinegar on top if you like. Pack leftovers for healthy lunches!

More Great Recipes: Vegetables|Side Dishes