Fancified ramen

By • October 27, 2015 0 Comments

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Fancified ramen

Author Notes: This is not really fancy ramen. It's a pretender. This is the cheap grocery store variety that lives in every dorm room in America, with add-ins (the sort-of authentic and the super not) that make it more than the sum of its parts. This is not real-deal, ramen shop ramen, but that doesn't mean this pretender isn't delicious and sometimes just the thing.

This is also not really a recipe so much as set of ideas to be applied in the time you have available. That makes for equally happy work lunches and drunken after-party, before-bed, hangover-inhibiting late night dinners.


Serves one or two, depending on your level of hunger and/or drunkenness

  • 1 packet ramen (if going the grocery store route, I like shrimp flavored variety, but any will do, including the slightly more exotic and inscrutable versions available at your local asian market)
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cups green stuff, chopped into ribbons (mix of basil, cilantro, spinach, romaine, whatever you have handy), see note on hardier greens
  • 1/4 small onion or medium shallot, very thinly sliced into quarter or half moons (2-3 tablespoons worth) or a couple scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 pre-cooked sausage (something with garlic, pepper or onion flavor is nice), cut in half and sliced into thin half-moons
  • 1 boiled egg (hard or soft, your choice), sliced in half or into thin rounds
  • 1 tablespoon fried scallions (see note, or those fried onions that rattle around your kitchen after a green bean casserole), optional
  • 1 or 2 teaspoons mayonnaise
  • 1 pinch finely ground red pepper
  1. Set a saucepan with the water over high heat. Add in your seasoning packet(s). (If you want less salt you can use a portion of your seasoning packet).
  2. While water is coming to a boil, do your slicing and into a large bowl or two smaller bowls place your chopped herbs, lettuces and/or greens, the thinly sliced onion and the sausage.
  3. Once water is boiling, put in noodles, stir and cover. Turn off stove and allow to cook with residual heat for 3-5 minutes, or until noodles are done to your liking.
  4. Pour saucepan contents into bowl or divide noodles and broth into two bowls if using. Top with a dollop of mayo, the sliced egg, and the fried scallions. Sprinkle on a little red pepper. Serve.
  5. Notes: For hardier greens like kale, chard, collards, etc., just make sure to cut out and discard or reserve for another use the ribs, and slice the leaves more thinly than you may for softer greens like herbs and spinach. The thinner cuts allow the broth to soften up the tougher greens. Fried scallions can usually be found jarred in your local asian market. Fried onions in a can make a good sub. If you are inclined to fry your own shallots or onions go for it. You could also sub in something else crunchy, like shredded raw carrot, chopped peanuts or toasted sesame seeds. Or omit it, it'll be good without too. In lieu of mayo and red pepper at the end, you could instead add small drizzles of hot sauce and sesame oil. Or garlic chili paste and a little coconut milk. Any small addition of fat and spice could be nice here.

More Great Recipes: Soups