Vinegar

Homemade Kewpie Mayonnaise

December 21, 2015
Photo by Melissa Goodwin
Author Notes

The irresistible umami flavor of Kewpie mayo is due to a lot of M.S.G., and gums and fillers help with the perfectly creamy texture. A homemade version will never be exactly like one off the shelf, but just like Hellman’s has its roots in a humble homemade sauce, so does Kewpie.

I wanted to give you a recipe that won't require a trip to a specialty market or mail-ordering obscure ingredients. To concentrate the tang and umami in my recipe without thinning out the mayonnaise too much, I cook down the vinegar and dashi. It only takes a few minutes and makes all the difference between ordinary and fantastic mayo! You might instinctively reach for rice wine vinegar when making Japanese food, but cider vinegar gets you closer to the taste of Kewpie. —Hannah Kirshner

  • Makes about 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons dashi, homemade or instant (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 3/4 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. In a small saucepan, bring the the cider vinegar and dashi to a simmer over high heat (if you aren't using dashi, just simmer the vinegar). Adjust the heat to keep it simmering, not boiling, until reduced to about 1 tablespoon, 3 to 5 minutes.
  2. Transfer the vinegar-dashi concentrate to a small mixing bowl. Form a ring with a damp dish towel to rest your bowl on—this will keep it stable. Add the Dijon and egg yolk and whisk to combine.
  3. While constantly whisking, very gradually drip in the oil down the side of the bowl into the yolk mixture. The mixture should emulsify and thicken.* You can drizzle a bit more quickly once the mixture is very thick.
  4. When all the oil has been incorporated, mix in the sugar and salt. You can add a little dashi or water to thin the mayonnaise so it will easily flow from a squeeze bottle but still hold its shape. It will thicken slightly once refrigerated. Transfer the mixture to a squeeze bottle. Refrigerate and use within 1 week.
  5. *If at any point you mixture breaks and separates instead of getting thick and creamy, don’t despair. Put a fresh egg yolk in a bowl, and slowly whisk the broken mixture into it, as if it were the oil: https://food52.com/blog/3711-how-to-fix-broken-aioli

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What does a farm girl in Brooklyn do with a painting degree from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and an obsession with food? Start a visually rich culinary publication! Write about cooking, develop recipes, and become a food stylist. Grow vegetables even if it's one scraggly tomato plant hanging from a fire escape, and find a way to keep chickens whether on a rooftop, in a neighbor's empty lot, a community garden, or the rare urban backyard (I've tried them all). On our small family farm in Washington state, I learned how food grows—and a deep respect for nature and agriculture—by helping to cultivate vegetables and raise chickens, goats and sheep. I continued to study food by working my way through the chain of production: harvesting herbs on an organic farm, selling specialty produce, serving farm-to-table food, baking artisan pastries and selling them at farmers markets, creating artful wedding cakes, developing and implementing craft cocktail programs, and testing and developing recipes for publications.