One-Pot Chicken Chasseur

November 14, 2017


Author Notes: This is a dish so regal it was once served on the luxurious Orient Express train. This—simplified—recipe reveals my lazy side: no making brown stock and veal stock as the originator, Philippe de Mornay (of Mornay sauce fame) would have us do. It’s a rich braise of mushrooms, chicken, and tomatoes, and though it tastes complex, it’s actually pretty simple to make and easy to increase quantities to cater for a crowd.Katherine Knowles

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 8 chicken thighs
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 4 cups chestnut or button mushrooms
  • 3 shallots
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 teaspoon tomato puree
  • 1 cup chicken or veal stock
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 thyme sprigs
  • 2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley
  • 1/2 cup cream
In This Recipe

Directions

  1. Season the chicken thighs well with salt. Heat the olive oil and butter in a large pot (a Dutch oven is perfect for this) and brown the chicken, leaving it to sizzle for 3-4 minutes on each side. Meanwhile, clean and quarter the mushrooms, and dice the shallots.
  2. Add the shallots and mushrooms and saute until they start to take on some color. Add the minced garlic and the tomato puree to cook through (just a minute or so).
  3. Pour in the wine, scraping down the pan, then add the stock and diced tomatoes. Add the bay leaves and thyme. Season the dish with a couple of pinches of salt and a good grind of pepper, and let simmer for 10 minutes with the lid on, and a further 30 with the lid off, by which time the chicken should be tender and the sauce reduced to a thick gravy.
  4. To finish the dish, stir in the cream and let it simmer for a minute to bring the flavors together. Serve with a sprinkle of parsley (and maybe some mashed potatoes or bread, to soak up all the juices).

More Great Recipes:
Stew|Milk/Cream|Parsley|Shallot|Thyme|Chicken Thigh

Reviews (13) Questions (1)

13 Reviews

Melanie G. February 26, 2018
Do you drain the diced tomatoes before adding? My sauce seems to be very watery and doesn't thicken as much as the picture presents.
 
Author Comment
Katherine K. February 26, 2018
Hmm. No, I don't usually drain the tomatoes before adding them. My first question is, did you use a small can? It's not the nice big cans that you could theoretically use to plan herbs in later, it's the small can that's the same size as standard baked beans. Could it be that? My next guess is that our simmers are differently simmering. I keep mine (lid off) with a few bubbles breaking the surface for 30 mins. It's not a super gentle simmer. I'm, certainly looking to evaporate a good portion of liquid and get the sauce to become more concentrated. If it still looks to wet(!) after 30 mins, I'd suggest boiling the heck out of the sauce for the last few minutes of cooking to get it to reduce the way you want it to. That's the good thing about chicken thighs - they're really robust and they can take it! I hope you enjoy it if you make it again!
 
Margo January 6, 2018
skinless?
 
Kate V. January 5, 2018
Did you use skinless thighs?
 
Author Comment
Katherine K. January 6, 2018
Not sure if this is a question to Suzanne or to me, but if it's to me ... I generally use skin on thighs, because I like the color you get on them. But if I'm making double the recipe and can't be bothered with the browning, I'd go with skinless for ease.
 
Suzanne P. December 18, 2017
I made this last night and it was very tasty and the boyfriend gave the thumbs up. My question is about the color of the sauce. Mine was not as deep red as the picture here once the cream was added. I used a tsp of tomato paste instead of puree. Could that be the only difference in the color?
 
Author Comment
Katherine K. December 18, 2017
A couple of thoughts on the darker sauce front: getting good color on the chicken makes a difference - the onions too. Those caramelized bits help darken the sauce. And yes, puree v paste makes a bit of a difference. Paste is more concentrated and gives the sauce that redder tinge, but also, reducing the sauce helps the color, and with puree, you have more liquid to reduce. Glad to hear it still tasted good though!
 
Lisa C. December 11, 2017
I made this over the weekend and I have to say, the leftover sauce is amazing over pasta the next day! I added heavy cream and shredded mozzarella and it was absolutely delicious. Two dinners out of one dish!
 
Author Comment
Katherine K. December 12, 2017
That sounds so good! I've never gone in a pasta direction with the leftovers - usually rice - but this sounds awesome. Will have to try!
 
Matthew T. November 15, 2017
Your train journey sounds memorable - great recipe, thanks!
 
Author Comment
Katherine K. November 15, 2017
I hope you enjoy it if you make it!<br />
 
Suzanne D. November 17, 2017
This sounds delicious and I can't wait to try it (after seeing the movie!).
 
Author Comment
Katherine K. November 20, 2017
I saw the movie yesterday and loved it - mad as a barrel of fish, but fabulous all the same! The dining car is featured heavily, and looked incredible. What a way to travel!