Tuna Crudo with Dukkah & Sizzling Olive Oil

By Emma Laperruque
March 9, 2018
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Author Notes: Raw tuna gets a visit from nutty, seedy, crunchy dukkah, followed by a splash of scorching hot olive oil. This will make more dukkah than you'll need, but you'll be happy to have the extra. Swirl with olive oil for a bread dip, or sprinkle on yogurt bowls or salads. Emma Laperruque

Serves: 2 to 4

Dukkah

  • 6 tablespoons raw hazelnuts
  • 6 tablespoons raw cashews
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 2 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

Crudo

  • 1/2 pound sushi-grade tuna, kept in the fridge until ready to use
  • 1 large lemon, halved
  • 1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons neutral-flavored oil with a high smoke point (such as sunflower)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Red pepper flakes, for garnish
  1. Make the dukkah. Combine the hazelnuts and cashews in a skillet big enough for them to be in a single layer. Set over medium-low heat and toast until deeply golden, stirring as needed so they cook evenly. Transfer to a mortar and pestle (or food processor, if you don’t have one). Wipe out the skillet of any nut remains. Add the sesame, fennel, coriander, cumin, and caraway seeds. Set over medium-low heat and toast until starting to color and very fragrant. Transfer to the mortar and pestle (or food processor). Add the salt. Smash until the texture looks right to you—chunky or fine or somewhere between.
  2. Slice the tuna into thin slabs. Arrange prettily on a plate. Squeeze the lemon on top (you can do this through a sieve to catch seeds). Sprinkle the mint on top.
  3. Combine the oils in a small skillet. Set over medium-high heat. Cook until very shimmery. Pour a spoonful over the tuna. It should fizz and sizzle. If it doesn’t, get it a little hotter. (Just don’t let it smoke! If it does, it’s burnt—toss.) When it’s the right temperature, spoon it evenly over the fish. Sprinkle with dukkah—figure about 3 tablespoons—and red pepper flakes, to taste. Serve immediately.

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