Butter

Toast With Buttered Raisins & Ricotta

November 19, 2019
1 Rating
Photo by Rocky Luten. Food Stylist: Yossy Arefi. Prop Stylist: Brooke Deonarine.
Author Notes

When warmed in butter, raisins grow plump and their flavor goes from cloying and tannic to gently sweet. Not quite jammy, yet no longer tough and chewy, the raisins become a whole new condiment something like a conserve, but far less work. Just imagine those warm pieces of fruit over creamy ricotta and crunchy toast, popping in your mouth, butter dripping down your chin. If you don’t like raisins, then dried cranberries, blueberries, and cherries all work beautifully here. Dates, prunes, and apricots work, too, though you’ll want to give them a rough chop first as they’re a big larger than your average raisin. —Rebecca Firkser

  • Prep time 5 minutes
  • Cook time 10 minutes
  • Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 3 (2-inch) pieces orange zest, sliced with a vegetable peeler
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/4 cup dried currants, or any other small dried fruit
  • 4 slices country bread
  • 3/4 cup full-fat ricotta
  • Flaky sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Melt butter with olive oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add ginger and orange zest and let sizzle for 10 seconds.
  2. Add the dried fruit to the pan and cook until fruit is warmed through, about 2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Pick out orange zest if you don’t want to eat it (but doesn’t it look pretty left in?).
  3. Meanwhile, toast bread to your desired crunchiness and let cool slightly.
  4. Slather each piece of toast with ricotta, then spoon on buttery raisins, making sure to get some of the juice on each piece. Top with a shower of flaky sea salt and a few grinds of black pepper.

See what other Food52ers are saying.

Rebecca Firkser is a freelance food writer and recipe developer. Her work has appeared in a number of publications, among them Food52, TASTE, Edible Manhattan, Extra Crispy, The Strategist, and Bon Appetit's Healthyish and Basically. She contributed recipes and words to the book "Breakfast: The Most Important Book About the Best Meal of the Day." Once upon a time, she studied theatre design and art history at Smith College, so if you need a last-minute avocado costume or want to talk about Wayne Thiebaud's cakes, she's your girl.