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All questions

What's the best kind of salt for making preserved lemons? I've always used kosher salt, but saw a recipe calling for "coarse salt." ;o)

Thanks so much. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked almost 3 years ago
8 answers 1694 views
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hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

I'd go with kosher. It's worked well for me (and I'm assuming you, since you're making preserved lemons again.) The minor concern I'd have with using something like coarse sea salt is that it would have additional minerals that may cause color changes over time. Maybe it's a silly concern, but I've got some in my fridge that I made with kosher salt about 11 months ago, that still look as good as the day they were made.

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AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 3 years ago

Very helpful, HLA! I think I'll do a test run with a small jar, just our of curiosity, if and when (aaaargh) my lemons ever ripen. (They're very late this year.) The kosher salt has always worked fine in the past. I just was wondering if there's a way to make them even better. ;o)

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hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

Do report back after you make your test batch.

Dsc_0122.nef-1
added almost 3 years ago

I generally go with kosher salt for my lime or lemon pickles .. It should work for preserved lemons as well..

Dsc_0048b
added almost 3 years ago

Not sure this matters, but with the amount of salt you use, kosher is mighty cost effective.

Bigpan
added almost 3 years ago

Use any in-iodized salt. Kosher works best in flakes, or sea salt (my preference). Use a bit more than you think you need. The lemons will not taste salty. After they are ready and you remove lemons, top up the jar with clear eater and salt. I even use the lemons on pizza !

Bigpan
added almost 3 years ago

Should say NON-iodized. ( damn intuitive iPad thinks it knows how to spell better than me)

Dsc00859_2
added almost 3 years ago

Antonia, I'm in the minority here, but I have to say that the one time I used coarse kosher salt mine didn't come out tender the way I like them. The salt was too coarse to permeate the skins evenly and they were still tough after the 30 day curing period. I personally prefer a finer un-iodized salt that will permeate the skins and leave them silken (fine sea may work as well). I've heard that there is such a thing as pickling salt that is fine for better absorption, which is why I may try fine sea salt next time I make them (having never seen pickling salt around these parts...).