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Is there a good substitution for pomegranate molasses?

asked by Bkpesch over 2 years ago
14 answers 6064 views
Scplogoblog
added over 2 years ago

Oddly enough, I just picked up a bottle of pomegranate molasses over the holidays because I was so curious about it and it pretty much is what it sounds like--very very thick, not quite sweet, not quite bitter, a few drops in the bottom of a champagne glass will do you very well. What are you using it for? It really isn't like many other things I've tasted, but I could imagine using a very thick raspberry (or other fruit) syrup. I think it all depends on what you are trying to do, but, yes, bottom line, make a very very thick simple syrup with berries of your choice.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen
Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

added over 2 years ago

Depends on what it's for but you could use marmalade, tamarind paste, or honey mixed with citrus.

Sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

What's the recipe? I would think cranberry juice and brown sugar might work. (or Cranberry and molasses)
reduce the juice and add the sugar component.
If using just cranberry juice...basically make a simple sugar with brown sugar. (depending if your juice pre-sweetened with sugar, taste and adjust).

Sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

This brings up an issue about questions and submitters. To get good answers we need good info.
I know some people like to keep questions short. That's fine.

But sometimes we can go "what no kumquats? Try a blood orange or a Meyer lemon instead"
I tend to think that people wanting subs for stuff that can't find, probably don't have any other 'exotic' stuff in their pantry.

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added over 2 years ago

I just got this app and am trying to figure it out. I couldn't see how to expand on my question. Sorry a newbie. It is for a vinaigrette which I wrote in my tag line. Recipe calls for pomegranate molasses olive oil red wine vinegar and Dijon

Sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Oh No, Bkpesch. You've stumbled on one of the helpful 'hotlines" on the web. IMHO If you have cranberry juice, just reduce it a bit, add a tsp or brown sugar would make a good sub for that application. Thanks for the reply.

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added over 2 years ago

You can make your own pomegranate molasses by boiling down pomegranate juice -- either fresh or bottled -- until you have a consistency that's a little thinner than maple syrup. If you use fresh or unsweetened bottled juice, add some sugar; if you use something like POM Wonderful, I'd taste the syrup before adding sugar, since the POM is already heavily sweetened.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen
Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

added over 2 years ago

Bkpesch -- first, thanks for trying out our app! second, I missed your tag -- my bad. I think Sam's suggestion of cranberry juice and brown sugar would work well as a sub in a vinaigrette. Let us know how it goes!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen
Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

added over 2 years ago

Also, maggiesara's idea to use POM if you have it handy.

Scplogoblog
added over 2 years ago

So it sounds like the recipe wants a burst of intense nuanced flavor, these can be hard to substitute. Tamarind and honey are lovely, but have very distinct flavors. I doubt its worth reducing a symple syrup to practically nil just for this. I'm going to suggest adding a bit of jam--I'm going to say (seedless) raspberry as my first choice, oh, maybe black cherry, think deep, think red. In fact, if you are feeling fussy, you could even reduce your jam until it is a thick and intense goo (which is what the molasses is). Honestly, considering the other ingredients, you could also reduce and make a syrup from a lovely balsamic with much the same result.

Scplogoblog
added over 2 years ago

So it sounds like the recipe wants a burst of intense nuanced flavor, these can be hard to substitute. Tamarind and honey are lovely, but have very distinct flavors. I doubt its worth reducing a symple syrup to practically nil just for this. I'm going to suggest adding a bit of jam--I'm going to say (seedless) raspberry as my first choice, oh, maybe black cherry, think deep, think red. In fact, if you are feeling fussy, you could even reduce your jam until it is a thick and intense goo (which is what the molasses is). Honestly, considering the other ingredients, you could also reduce and make a syrup from a lovely balsamic with much the same result.

Scplogoblog
added over 2 years ago

Sorry, don't know how this got on here twice and, worse, don't know how to delete the second response!

Sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

@Bkpesch

I have another idea. If you go the cranberry, sugar reduction route.
Make a bit more to use after you make the dressing.
Then, Slice up some ginger and reheat it and let it simmer. Strain it and jar it, use that to mix with soda/seltzer water or for teas. Oh, I think I'll do this myself...a cranberry 'ginger' sugar in soda water would hit the spot about now. (well, it's late, so maybe a touch of vodka in that too).

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added over 2 years ago

Thanks for all the suggestions! I'll give the cranberry juice reduction a try with a little dark brown sugar to pull out more of those molasses notes.