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Any tips on how to ship breads & similar perishables..

Just wondering how well they keep and for how long & if I need to stick any icepacks in..

asked by Panfusine almost 3 years ago
2 answers 729 views
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sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

I recently shipped cookies USPS 2-3 day and the recipients said they were still fresh. Not sure about bread but would be wary of icepacks unless you are shipping overnight they will melt.

Nog
added almost 3 years ago

A vacuum packer is your dearest friend! The only problems I've run into using it to pack up baked goods are if the item in question is someone squishy. Cookies do better than muffins - that sort of thing. Still, there's nothing that can beat it for keeping homecooked goodies fresh during travel. And I'm talking serious travel times here - had cookies last the three week travel time to a deployed cousin... Good luck! Would second sdebrango to beware the icepack. Melted water (or condensation) will probably cause problems no matter how well you are able to wrap the items.