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What do you use to sear duck breast in a frying pan on stovetop?.

I was told to sear the duck for 15 minutes on each side and then put it in the oven for 10. Does this make sense? I wasn't told what to sear it in.

asked by kutch almost 5 years ago
8 answers 2794 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

I like to use cast iron. Not only do I get a great sear but I can put in in the oven too. I have used both regular cast iron and enameled such as Le Creuset with great success.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

I would sear them skin side down in a very hot skillet. Since duck is high fat, I wouldn't think you'd need anything else.

516f887e 3787 460a bf21 d20ef4195109  bigpan
added almost 5 years ago

Score the skin first ! A thin coat of canola oil. Wait for Pam to get very hot then skin side down and reduce heat a bit. Check in the minutes, flip, then put in preheated oven until med rare (350F)
Save the duck fat - it's expensive and great with potato .

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

We pan fry our boneless duck breasts for about 8 minutes a side, then tent it on a board for a while before cutting into slices and serving atop a nice risotto. It comes out pink, but that is what we like. It seems like the times you mention are too long.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

I use a non-stick pan, not too big or else the fat splatters like crazy!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

I use a non-stick pan, not too big or else the fat splatters like crazy!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

Cast iron is by far the best for duck. It conducts heat very well and keeps a consistent high temp for a great sear. I wouldn't use much cooking fat other than a little bit to get started. The duck will easily render enough fat to cook it in. You may even have to drain some to avoid splatter.