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Bottarga

I'm looking for new ways to use bottarga. I like to shave it onto pasta, or crispy buttered bread, but am hoping for some inspiring new ideas. Thanks!

Kristy is an expert at making things pretty and a former Associate Editor of Food52.

asked almost 6 years ago

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4 answers 1506 views
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HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added almost 6 years ago

I think it might taste great on risotto or polenta. Right now, for some reason, I'm craving it in with some sticky rice, maybe a tiny amount in the middle of a Japanese onigiri.

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amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added almost 6 years ago

It's good grated onto soft scrambled eggs.

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pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 6 years ago

Bottarga is a bit tricky because the flavor is so strong (like colatura/garum). It's agressive. I'd be thinking about matching it with another seafood like scallops, or skate. Shaving it on pasta remains safe because it does arrive with arrogance and authority. But you could combine a milder fish in there. It "might" work in risotto but that's a challenge. Possibly crab meat in that risotto. Sorry, still trying to think context here...

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added almost 6 years ago

I don't have a specific suggestion, but you might try looking through some old (medieval to Renaissance) recipes from Italy, England and Spain. I sampled bottarga at a dinner celebrating Francis Bacon--strong flavor is right. Sheesh, I can still taste the stuff!

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