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2 answers 995 views
7df25050 c11a 4106 88b5 e77fef90a10c  fb me
added almost 5 years ago

It is best to use canning (pickling)salt or kosher salt, if you have a tough time finding canning salt. (the less course, the better, if you use kosher salt). Pickling salt is similar to table salt, but doesn't have the iodine and anti-caking additives that turn pickles dark and the pickling liquid cloudy. Pickles would still taste good - just wouldn't look as great!

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0e5c2b73 3f18 46e4 95c9 cbc8af359f65  sadie crop
Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

added almost 5 years ago

Ellyn is right; you need to avoid salt with anti-caking chemicals or iodine for best results. If you can find fine-grained kosher salt without anti-caking agents (a very few do have anti-caking agents), that will work. If all you can find is coarse kosher salt, you can process it in a coffee grinder or spice mill until it's finer. The reason you want it fine is so it will dissolve more quickly. There's a bit more info here: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how...

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