🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Latkes

I just made latkes using CI's method of nuking the shredded potatoes a bit, and the fresh out of the pan latkes were absolutely perfect. The ones held in the oven -225 degree convection oven on a baking rack until people went for seconds were..meh. Not exactly soggy, but dull. Is there a secret to holding latkes, or is this just one of those treats that the cook stays in the kitchen with people line up holding their plates?

asked by Melusine almost 2 years ago
7 answers 1712 views
F83774ec c18a 46a4 8dff 00877f15aed6  image
Kristen W.

Kristen W. is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

Hi Melusine. I asked a similar use toon a while ago. Search the hotline for "keeping pancakes crispy" -- there were some helpful suggestions.

F83774ec c18a 46a4 8dff 00877f15aed6  image
Kristen W.

Kristen W. is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

"Use toon"??? That was supposed to be "QUESTION!"

012dfbd1 43d9 417a ae27 f5cd7f65b8fe  img 0736
added almost 2 years ago



I haven't used that method or recipe, but for many years have made latkes ahead of time (so I can visit with guests). When I learned to make latkes, I learned a few rules that may help. When I make them, I drop them by the tablespoon and flatten them a bit (if they're too thick, they won't be crispy). Never turn them more than once (so they don't absorb too much oil, which can make them soggy). Drain well on paper towels and transfer to cookie sheets if keeping warm or racks if you're going to freeze them -- but only in one layer (stacking them can lead to sogginess). Can keep warm at 250 or freeze (let cool completely. Freeze in single layers and put in freezer bags after completely frozen). Cook directly from frozen (don't defrost) at 350 (in one layer) till hot and crisp (about 20 minutes). I hope this helps.

1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

It's really important to only put a single layer on the pan. If you stack/overlap them too much in the oven, they'll steam and lose their crispiness.

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 2 years ago

If I'm keeping them warm, I put them on a rack over a sheet pan and cover loosely with foil in a warming oven. I have never nuked the shredded potatoes first. Not sure what the purpose of that would be. CAVEAT: serving fried food to "company" pretty much ensures you (or a person you hire/hornswaggle) will be int he kitchen attending to the frying process. Fried food is ALWAYS best a la minute.

9222c532 27a1 4ba1 88e4 001b7bd829f8  image
added almost 2 years ago

Melusine, with regard to how the first batch turned out, do you think it was worth the extra effort? I was intrigued by that recipe.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

I'm not an expert latke maker, but The Friend loves them and he'd had a really bad day at work. I had sour cream and apple butter in the fridge and the recipe was in last week's CI featured recipe, so I tried it. The fresh batch was perfect - crispy outsides and creamy middles. They were not just fried shredded potatoes. I probably made them too thick, which, as Louisez commented, meant they didn't hold well. The CI article explains the science behind the brief pre-cooking in the microwave. The process took the "are they done in the middle" stress out of the equation for me, and the end result was really, really good.