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I made a lemon meringue pie the day prior to serving. Next day, I noticed it weeped. How can i prevent this in the future?

I used cream of tartar when whipping the egg whites to help stabilize.

asked by giselle about 1 year ago
10 answers 3882 views
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ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 1 year ago

Weeping is the product of too much humidity in the atmosphere. But I'll bet you refrigerated the pie overnight, and I've yet to see a lemon meringue pie come out of the fridge without tears. By the way, the past tense of weep is wept. ;)

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added about 1 year ago

Hello June, It was a rather warm the day when I baked it. And yes, It was refrigerated overnight. Do you have any recommendations to prevent or are we are we at the mercy of the weather?

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added about 1 year ago

I would bake the pie on the day you plan to serve it. Pie is always best when it is fresh. You might try an Italian meringue the next time. It is more stable and less likely to release excess moisture.

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added about 1 year ago

Thanks Maedl, I'll try an Italian Meringue next time. It was for a work bake sale; difficult to wake up earlier to bake.

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added about 1 year ago

If you want to make a pie that has to be ready early in the day, make the crust and fit it into the pie plate the day before, then stick it in the refrigerator. Make the lemon filling the day before, and refrigerate that as well. Make the meringue the day the pie will be used, and assemble and bake the pie as well. Most of the work is done the day before and you’ll know the pie will be at its peak. Or, you can make something that will improve with a day’s rest--like a spice cake, applesauce cake . . . .

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added about 1 year ago

PS I think it’s great that you would bake a pie for a bake sale!

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creamtea

Lisanne is a trusted home cook.

added about 1 year ago

Maedl, I always had the impression my honey cake tasted better the next day. Now you've confirmed it. The flavors of gingerbread, honey cake, etc. always seem a little off the day they're baked, but are delectable a day or even two later.

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added about 1 year ago

Absolutely! Cakes and cookies made with honey and/or spices develop better flavors as they get older. My mother always started Christmas baking the weekend after Thanksgiving because so many of the cookies had to age before she deemed them good enough to serve. I was not so particular and helped myself to a cookie or two whenever I walked by the tins, which she stacked in a cool, out-of-the way place.

22b9ddc9 fc61 48a3 949e dee341974288  liz and dad
added about 1 year ago

I read somewhere that spreading meringue immediately over hot filling and baking right away helps avoid weeping.

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added about 1 year ago

at my bakery in Florida, we use meringue powder and never have a problem w/ weeping. I don't think the temp of the pie is the problem. I have only experienced weeping problems when using liquid egg whites.