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Will the carton egg whites whip up for baking?

I have a meringue recipe that calls for 1.5 c of whites, and no use for yolks. My grocer sells little cartons of organic 100% whites near the egg substitute, and it seemed a good shortcut, but want to be sure they will still whip up properly!

asked by stacey_ballis over 5 years ago

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18 answers 52471 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 5 years ago

No

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F8c5465c 5952 47d4 9558 8116c099e439  dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 5 years ago

Over the years, I've gone through I can't count how many gallons of batched EWs. Couldn't work without them, and you are incredibly lucky to find them in small quantities, and organic at them. Buy them, use them, and know how much I envy you.

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B72fce05 5dfd 491a 92eb 773b625d4556  gray tilt
added over 5 years ago

Was at the grocer today, says specifically on the carton that they can not be used for meringues or other baking requiring whipped whites. Thanks to all for replying.

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F8c5465c 5952 47d4 9558 8116c099e439  dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 5 years ago

In terms of chemistry, there is no reason at all that you can't use them for meringues. In terms of biology, on the other hand, it sounds as though they are unpasteurized, and if that's the case, that is the reason for the admonishment not to use them . . . You can certainly use them for meringues. You'll just need to make a Swiss meringue, and you'll wind up with a better meringue because of it. Set a pot with a couple of inches of water on the stove to simmer. Your proportion of EW to sugar will be 1:2, say a cup (8 ounces) of EW to 16 ounces (2 1/3 cups) sugar. Measure them into a heatproof bowl and whisk them together. Set the bowl over the simmering water. Whisk until the mixture reaches 140 degrees, at which point the EW will be pasteurized. Transfer the mixture to the bowl of a mixer. Beat at high speed with the whip until the bowl is cool to the touch. You'll have a killer meringue.

B72fce05 5dfd 491a 92eb 773b625d4556  gray tilt
added over 5 years ago

Says on the carton that they are pasturized and not suitable for meringues.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added about 3 years ago

After reading your answers here I decided to try it and made great Merengue for Pavlova dessert. I used a KitchenAid and Sunnyside egg whites which were pasteurized. And no, this is not a commercial. I fully intend never to waste egg yolks again in making Merengue.
Jopie

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84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added about 3 years ago

The Cook's Illustrated people found that some carton egg whites whip better than others. http://www.cookscountry...
Be sure to watch the video.

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Bb52d756 77a3 475e 8325 9de860b3c10a  stringio
added almost 3 years ago

No. I just tried. I have been making meringue for decades and never had a problem until I tried to use prepackaged liquid egg whites today. I was going to make angel food cake and thought I would try this as a shortcut.
My first batch would not stiffen even after I added cream of tarter. I figured maybe I didn't let them warm enough to room temperature. I tried again. They just won't stiffen.
Out of desperation I turn to the internet to see most manufactures don't recommend their product for meringue or angel food cakes as the whites are pasteurized. I guess it somehow affects the molecular structure. That is what I get for trying to cheat.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 2 years ago

Agree with previous response - don't waste your ingredients only to find out the egg whites in the carton don't perform. As an experienced baker, I've tried twice and they don't firm up properly, especially if you're making a meringue. Take a few extra minutes to separate real eggs!

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Ea2b3ae2 ef6e 42ea 9ef3 a1909650c4dd  fb avatar
added about 2 years ago

only reason it says it is not suitable for meringue is because egg whites in a carton have chemical stabilizers added to them so the egg doesnt go bad in the carton. they do work for meringue but they DON'T work for making macaron cookies though

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69d2403d 88f4 4b72 b0b9 84a21f4d0561  img 1445
added about 2 years ago

If you decide to use fresh eggs from the shell, you can always freeze the yolks (you can freeze the whites as well in case you ever make a big batch of mayo or hollandaise).

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

I tried yesterday with two different type of egg whites. First I tried egg beaters egg whites and it was a disaster. I then tried Pete and Gerrys. At first I didn't think it would work, but then I tried it with a full teaspoon of cream of tartar and did not add the sugar until after I had soft peaks. It took much longer to beat up, but they worked beautifully.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 8 months ago

NO, NONE OF THEM!

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4a78244a a719 4cc8 9b12 dc803b363712  img 3924
added 8 months ago

Just used 100% egg whites from the carton (Costco brand) to make merengue cookies. Was skeptical at first, but they whipped up beautifully with a 1/2 tsp of cream of tartar.

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0076863a 6c31 418c b2f3 164b8c5fbc06  fb avatar
added 6 months ago

After reading all the comments here, it seems there is no consensus, so allow me to add my own two cents.

I needed to make 3 batches swiss meringue buttercream in 3 different flavors. That's a dozen egg whites and no use for the yolks, so I purchased EW in a carton and the only ingredient was the EW. 2 of the frosting recipes were from Cook's Illustrated and had been successful in the past. Both turned out just fine with the carton EW. The 3rd flavor was a new one to me, but the recipe appeared to have the same ingredients, ratios, and process as the other two with the exception of the key ingredient, pureed strawberries. I actually did a test of the strawberry frosting, because I hadn't used it before and it eventually turned out alright. Because the frosting wouldn't come together and just appeared slimy, for lack of a better word, I ended up adding a couple pinches of cream of tartar and maybe a cup of powdered sugar. The extra sugar helped to "dry out" the frosting if you can imagine that. Today was the day I needed the strawberry frosting and it totally failed. The curdled mess wouldn't come together and so I tried again. This time using a recipe from Martha Stewart (CI didn't have a version of this frosting), and it all seemed to be just fine until I added the strawberry puree. Now, I used frozen strawberries, but it looked fine until I added the full amount that was called for in the recipe. Again, it looked "wet" and "slimy", so I added some powdered sugar to dry it out and it helped a bit.
It tastes absolutely delicious, like strawberry ice cream, but it makes me sad to look at it.

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83b2f7bb 6d57 4b26 a96e f27f66b1e409  14355058 10103657439758468 7616383974552013464 n
added 6 months ago

Try using freeze-dried berries in frosting to cut out the extra water. They should food process easily to give a smooth texture.

83b2f7bb 6d57 4b26 a96e f27f66b1e409  14355058 10103657439758468 7616383974552013464 n
added 6 months ago

Wow sounds like lots of variation in answers. Depending on what you're making, you could use the egg yolks for a french/swiss buttercream. If you're making maracon, you could use the buttercream as a filling. I've done this before, and the extra frosting kept well in the refrigerator.

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8d60657d bcad 4007 a335 c5d41345c4a3  image
added 4 months ago

My local Safeway carries a brand called Pete and Gerry's-- cage free liquid egg whites. Tried them yesterday for a Pavlova. They did not whip up quite as well as regular egg whites, but they did the job and in my opinion, the trade off is well worth it to avoid all the extra egg yolks. The batch I whipped with a pinch of cream of tartar did a little better than the batch whipped with a tsp vinegar.

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