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how long is overnight for my croissants?

Its made out of yeast,
The recipe said i have to eait overnight but i probably cant because i made the dough at 2 pm. If i have to wait for 8 hours i need some sleep.
can i wait a little longer? Like the next morning? Thanks.

asked by audreyyooo about 1 year ago
8 answers 317 views
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Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added about 1 year ago

Yes you can wait longer.
Nothing bad happens to dough when it's going through a cold, slow rise in the refrigerator.
In fact, the opposite - such a rise often helps with development of yeast and fine bubbles, which provide good texture in the final product.
Only problem you may have is if you leave it very long, and the dough starts to rise or expand, punch it down, cover and come back when you have time to finish the recipe.

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Amy
added about 1 year ago

Yup...longer isn't an issue. It's just a way of saying "don't rush". If you sleep, it's at least an 8 hour "rest" for the dough and for the yeast to get lively. And it helps the taste. I wouldn't leave it for days and days, but even 24 hours isn't really going to hurt. I have a mock croissant dough that I use and the recipe says it can chill for up to 4 days, and in my experience with my recipe, the more it sits, the better the dough. Experiment and see :)

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added about 1 year ago

I agree with Nancy and Amy, the longer the better! Especially when you rest it in between turns and allow a long rest after the final turn. It will have a well developed robust flavor as opposed to a young and light flavor.

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 1 year ago

Yes, I would wait until the next morning. There's no reason you have to bake them in the middle of the night. But you wouldn't want to rest them shorter than the 8 hours.

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added about 1 year ago

Not directly related to your problem, but I really hate the instruction to do something "overnight". It makes me feel like I am supposed to be cooking something at 8 AM. It makes sense for some things ( that breakfast strata) but not maybe for the meat I want to grill for dinner. I wish recipes would specify soaking/resting/marinating etc times along the lines of "up to 8 hrs" i.e. do the prep for dinner in the morning versus "12-24 hrs" which would mean prep tomorrow's dinner tonight. I realize for many things it does not matter but sometimes 24 hrs soaking in something is way too much.

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PieceOfLayerCake

PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking.

added about 1 year ago

We make croissants daily at my bakery and often the "books" are left in the fridge for 2 - 3 days. I wouldn't go much longer than that, though.

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PieceOfLayerCake

PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking.

added about 1 year ago

We also don't do anything to it. If you punch it down, you redistribute the yeast and it proofs faster. As long as its tightly wrapped, just let it be and punch it down when you're going to roll.

Longer is usually better for bread, but there comes a point when the flavor becomes decidedly "boozy".

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PieceOfLayerCake

PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking.

added about 1 year ago

We also don't do anything to it. If you punch it down, you redistribute the yeast and it proofs faster. As long as its tightly wrapped, just let it be and punch it down when you're going to roll.

Longer is usually better for bread, but there comes a point when the flavor becomes decidedly "boozy".