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do you have any uses for used coffee grounds?

i always feel like they might have a better destiny than my compost bin. thank you!

asked by Caroline Lange almost 3 years ago

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20 answers 1464 views
Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

I use them to make a DIY disposal freshener. It also sharpens the blades. It has coffee, baking soda, salt..I forget what else, but I can get the link for you if you'd like.

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AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 3 years ago

Susan W, your answer makes me feel much less guilty about putting them down the disposal occasionally instead of into the green waste. I had no idea! ;o)

Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 3 years ago

AJ..I think it's a perfectly good way to go. The pods are made with more ingredients. Here's the link in case you want to take a look.
http://www.popsugar.com...

Niknud
Niknud

Rachael is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

I use it instead of baking soda in the fridge for air freshener - works like a charm. I've also heard it works as an ingredient in homemade body scrubs (like salt or sugar) but I haven't tried it myself - but Old Man Google can probably gin up some recipes for you!

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CanadaDan
added almost 3 years ago

Do you just keep it in an open tupperware? This sounds like a great idea but i'm worried my constant moving things around in the fridge would mean a coffee grounds spill...

Niknud
Niknud

Rachael is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

I could see where that would be problematic.... I recommend a small canning jar with cheesecloth and ring. It hasn't caused a mess yet!

caninechef
added almost 3 years ago

I work for a cosmetic manufacturer and yes, we have an ingredient consisting of recycled coffee grounds that can be used in scrubs.

Jona @AssortedBites
added almost 3 years ago

I was just going to say body scrub, it's amazing. I usually mix it with brown sugar, honey and coconut oil ( might add some orange zest or oats as well).

AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 3 years ago

Here's an interesting piece on using coffee grounds in your garden: http://www.gardensalive... Be sure to link through to the whole article. Very informative! ;o) P.S. Occasionally I put them, in small quantities and scratched well into the soil, around my blueberry bushes and Meyer lemon. ;o)

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Meaghan F
added almost 3 years ago

I steep my used grounds in hot water, then let it cool before watering certain plants. Like liquid fertilizer I guess. I only have anecdotal evidence, but think it makes a difference on peppers and tomatoes.

Smaug
added almost 3 years ago

They're excellent in compost piles and worm bins- Pete's coffee stores give away large bags of exhausted grounds for this purpose. I use unbleached filters, and throw the whole thing in. They're also said to discourage snails, I think, but I haven't seen it myself. There's a hydrangea outside my kitchen door that more or less grew up on coffee grounds, and it didn't seem to keep the slugs away, at any rate.

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Smaug
added almost 3 years ago

Oops, didn't see that second sentence- there is no better use than a compost bin, but people have been known to use them to stain wood. Don't really recommend it, but it smells better than most stains (walnut husks make a great stain, and smell good too).

boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 3 years ago

They're excellent in compost.

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Maedl
Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added almost 3 years ago

Ever so often, my counter tops get sticky even though I give them a good cleaning daily. When that happens. I sprinkle used coffee grounds on the counter and scrub away. It is a gentle way to remove sticky stuff.

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cookbookchick
added almost 3 years ago

I either use them on my garden or toss them on the trash. I have always avoided putting coffee grounds in my garbage disposal because I was advised not to years ago. Here's what I found today on a plumbing website:
Avoid putting coffee grounds down the garbage disposal. They won’t harm the garbage disposal and they’ll actually help eliminate odors. However, they can accumulate in drains and pipes, causing clogs. Best to avoid.

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cookbookchick
added almost 3 years ago

*in the trash

Jenny Maria
added almost 3 years ago

Bodyscrub
Or mix in come cardamom, a madras curry and cumin mix or cinnamon and make coffee agian
I got this Odd tip in an old magasin and it works with a french press

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calendargirl
added almost 3 years ago

My mother always dumped coffee grounds on the ferns around her Maine cottage. The ferns were lush and thriving.

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Constant Swagemakers
added almost 3 years ago

Just throw it in the sink! Why? Because the coffee grounds help to get rid of fat residues in the plumbing. (like the scrubbing in cosmetics, mentioned before)

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Smaug
added almost 3 years ago

Unless they absorb the fat and turn to concrete, a more likely outcome. The ability and inclination of fats to move through sewer pipes tends to be greatly overestimated by those anxious to get rid of them.