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can you freeze fresh ricotta?

asked by fisheri over 7 years ago

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9 answers 16539 views
debbiet
added over 7 years ago

Yes, I have heard that you can freeze it. The texture will be a bit more liquidy though.

I haven't done it myself, but it's worth a try. I would put it in a zip lock freezer bag with all the air smooshed out.

Here is a link I found
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu...

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RobertaJ
added over 7 years ago

I wouldn't if you're going to want to use it for an application where the texture will be important (like a manicotti filling or a cheesecake). Maybe for a lasagna filling, but even then, I'd worry it would get too runny.

If you're just going to blend it down into something like a sauce, I'd think you'd be OK.

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healthierkitchen
added over 7 years ago

I think I might try it with packaged ricotta, but I'd be hesitant with really good, fresh ricotta. Though, I guess it's better than throwing it out...

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fisheri
added over 7 years ago

thanks to all of you. healthierkitchen has my dilemma down. too much, too good, hate to toss it.

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ChefDaddy
added over 7 years ago

If your worried about fresh riccotta being to runny. After it thaws you might want to try draining it in cheese cloth or a fine mesh strainer before using.

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healthierkitchen
added over 7 years ago

If the alternative is throwing it out I'd definitely give freezing it a try. I'm just guessing (as I think you are) that what you'll have at the end will be usable, but won't be quite the same type of product you started with.

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ChefDaddy
added over 7 years ago

I think this falls under the catagory: Don't know until you try! What do you have to loose if the alternative is to throw it out. Except some freezer space.

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Mgmnyc
added over 7 years ago

Yes! I once picked up a gorgeous pot of fresh ricotta at a farmers' market. My husband, unpacking the bags, thought it was ice cream and stuck it in the freezer. I drove myself crazy for a few days searching the fridge before I found it. I was not able to use it right away, so it sat for a couple of weeks. When finally defrosted, it was absolutely delectable, a bit drier than fresh ricotta, and perfect for lasagna.

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Sue Marie
added 11 months ago

LOL re your search for it. Glad it ended up being a test for freezing as this is the answer I was looking for. I wanted to make a lasagna and forget to buy ricotta. I missed the sale and paid almost double for it the other day...and then it went on sale again. I was hoping to freeze some for a future lasagna.

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