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What is a decent substitute for Chinese cooking wine? Will Marsala work?

asked by Sadassa_Ulna over 7 years ago

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10 answers 106498 views
Robin O'D
added over 7 years ago

A dry sherry will work.

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AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 7 years ago

I use a medium dry sherry. Marsala would likely be too sweet and heavy, at least for my taste. Mirin (Japanese rice wine) is also a great substitute, but be sure to check for sweetness, when using any of these -- or when using the Chinese cooking wine, for that matter -- and add a dash of vinegar to sharpen the sauce, if necessary. ;o)

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Queen of Spoons
added over 7 years ago

I'd like to know a little more about the recipe, but I'd be tempted to try sake, with maybe a tiny bit of mirin.

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cookinginvictoria
added over 7 years ago

I use a dry sherry (usually manzanilla or amontillado) or in a pinch I have substituted dry white wine.

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Sadassa_Ulna
added over 7 years ago

I'd like to try the wildcard-winning Gong Bao tonight and my liquor cabinet is frighteningly bare. I have some mirin so perhaps I'll try that and reduce the sugar a tad as AntoniaJames points out. Thanks for the input!

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amysarah
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 7 years ago

If you mean the darker Chinese cooking wine - Shao hsing - then dry sherry is a very good sub; for white Chinese cooking wine - a dry white (French, Italian, California, whatever.)

Mirin cab be okay too, but it's much sweeter than white Chinese wine, so adjust accordingly.

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isabelita
added over 7 years ago

My chinese cooking teacher always used scotch.

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Helen's All Night Diner
added over 7 years ago

I always substitute tequilan for Chinese wine.

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Sadassa_Ulna
added over 7 years ago

Thanks everyone, I have scotch & tequila & mirin... so one will work!


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AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 7 years ago

I am so intrigued by the idea of using Scotch!! Definitely going to file that interesting tidbit for use in the near future. ;o)

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